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在线捕鱼游戏2020年06月03日06时59分52秒

时间:2020-06-03 06:59:53 作者:头条新闻 浏览量:70470

复制网址领彩金【ag88.shop】rvzs TjbsED1mFor 50 yea\r】s an Israeli【 o【il comp【【any has 】kept bathers 【off a Red Sea bea/ch near】 t/he resort of Eilat bu】t \it co【/uldn’t 】stop sea life from flouri\shing.I【n a wor\ld where co】【r】al r】eefs are s】hrink\ing rapidly, the one \in Eila\t has grown.Due/ to /a lack of human interf】e【rence,】 a spectacular /coral reef blo/】sso】med o】v【er time attracting exotic /fi】sh \and/【 dolphins to th/is 【aquatic paradi\se.The 300-me\tre-long be】ach was handed back to the publi\c a year an/d a half ago after the】 Eilat Ashkelon P【ipeline 】Company (EAPC) 【scaled back it\s operat】io【ns.Now, with access lift【【e/d, int】erest is /mounting 【f\rom scuba divers \an\d tourist】s/ alike w/ho want【 to vi】sit.In response, Israel's Na/ture and Par/ks Authority decided to relocate the cora\ls for their own pr/otecti】on so \the /ind】ustri/al de/bris left /】】by E【APC\ could be removed.S【hare this articleCopy/paste】 t【he article 【video embe】/d link below:CopyShareTweetSharesendS】hareTw】eetSharesendMoreHideShareSendSh【areShare\ShareSendSh/areShareY/ou\ might also 【like 】 '\;Israel is no l/onger a democracy�】9;: Netan\yahu accused of exp【loi】ting coron/avirus to sa/ve career 【 / 】 \】 / / Israel e\】lection: Exit p/olls give Netanyah】u nar\r/ow/ lead / 【 \ \ 】 】 】 / 】 \ \/ / 】 】 Palestinian P\resident Ab】bas cu】ts ties with Israel a】nd US 】over peace plan / More aboutCora/lsIsrael\Envir【onmentEnvironmental protectio【noil 【industry】Touri\sm Browse today's tag】sCXFY

8dATEasy【Jet unveils plans to become world&】#0//9;s first carb/on-】neutr】al airlinefizr

LdmOWhen it【 comes to cleaning 【up 】the \Oceans, tec【hn/ology may be good b\ut education is even better87WQTwjN

5kfk\Founda/tion promot【es sustainable food 【product/i】【onO6x0

3czc【Szi】get m】us\ic fe【【st】ival in Hungary/ sh】owcases its gre】en /c/\redentialsgZWl

hv2TWhen it【 comes to cleaning 【up 】the \Oceans, tec【hn/ology may be good b\ut education is even betterzFHX

【At the frontline of an 【Ext/inction Rebellion climate protest i/n】 Berlin

nEOgTake/ a look at Prince Har\ry's re】ma/rkable message on Earth】 DayaXT6

iZGWScientists in【 J\or/dan have discov【ered that corals \in the 【Gulf of Aqab【a are\ resisting the rise \in】 water tempe/ratures.Across the\ w/orld/, coral reefs are【 dying at rapid rates due\ to overfis\hing, pol【lution an/d climate ch】ange.It&rsq/uo;s est/i/mated that\ half the of earth\’s r【/eefs have been lost.This figure is thought to be critical, considering that corals are the habita\t of /one in fou【r 【of all marine species.【/Furthermore, up to half of the w/orld&rs【q【u/o;s oxygen co【mes】 fro【m t【\he oceans and the cor\a【l r\eefs wi/【thin.The exact/ reason /for the corals’ resilience in Jordan is s【till unknown, but some analys\t/s b【eli【eve tha\t t/he creatures【 evolved d/ur\ing/ the \last ice age of more tha【n 20,000 years ago.Samp/le/s of c/or/als in Jor/dan used for【 analy/sis】Doctor Fuad Al【\-Horani, professor of coral 【bi】ology and ecology at the //University of\ Jordan, ho\pes that the marine】 inverteb】ra】tes【 【may one-day be the ke】\y to re-pop/ulating th】e world’s\ dyi】ng reefs.“There are tech【niques -/ we can propagate corals," he says. "We can climatise them to c/on/ditions available to them in t【he other 】seas. So, o/nce we grow 】them, w】e can send them abroad where/ they【 ca【n grow them into 】dete【riorated areas or damaged 】r】eef areas./&rd】quo】;Doctor Al Hor/ani wor/ki/ng on c【orals in JordanTOURISM & EC【ONOMIC DEVELOPMENT\ STIL/L J\EOPARDISE AQABA RE【\EFSSpanni】ng【 a distance of 2】7 kilom】etres,/ the s/l/ither】 o\f coastland】 calle】d Aqab/a【 is/ Jordan&/rsq\uo;s only sea-outlet.Despite glimm\ers of hope, the port【\ city&/rsq\uo;s coral remains\ in dange/r, wit】h glo【bal dev【elopment and pollution threatening its surv】ival.Jordan&r】squo;s【 coastland and 】only portTo enc\ourage【 economic】 d【ev/e【lop】ment, whi/lst p\rotecting the re\【efs, i/s therefore a con/【stant c/】hallenge f/or the Jordanian authorities.】Aqaba\ is a major tourism hub which we【lcomed around 100,000 v\isito\rs last year. D/ue to t/he sector&rsqu【o;s expansion, Jordan&rsquo】;/s only 【port 【w】as/ re【locat/ed to】 the si/te 【of one of Aqa/ba&r/squo】】;s lar【gest reefs in 2006/.The governmen【t, w/ith \th/e help of the United Natio/ns, worked to save a portion of t【he t/housand-year-old 【【reef【 by r】/elocatin【g\ t【he coral two miles f】】urther \【alo/ng the coastline】.Co【ral r/eefs in Jo\rdan being r/\eloc/【\atedAccord/ing to Neda/l Al Ouran, He/ad of】 \th/e Environment【, Climat\e Change and Disaster Risk Reduc\tion of th】e United Nations Development/ Programme, /the/ replantation far】ed mu/ch better than \expec【】ted.&】ldquo;We had great】 success,” he says. &ldquo【;Lucki】ly, we got】 a grow】th【 ra/te\ of more \t【han 85 per cen\t,】 w】hich is unique.\ Globally, you would fin\d 【the average growth rat\e af【】ter tra/nspl】antation and translocation would 】be 65\】.”Eco-dive\rs in the region l】ike Abdullah Al Momany, howe/ver【, believe that much more still/ n】】eeds to be done.He is fearful that the relentless rate o】f progress and de】velopme】nt is thre【at【ening to compro】mise the re】al draw of the area/, the re/efs.&ldqu】o/;Here in Aqaba, our \big/gest pr\oblem is us affec/ting【 the marine【 environment as humans,&rd\quo; he says. &ldquo\;I think the government need/s to enforce the law, do more awar【enes\s program【m】【es, and/ do m/ore effort/ in /protect】ing the marine life.&rdqu/o;Share this arti】cleCopy/paste th】e ar/tic【l【】】e video embed lin】k【\ below:CopyShareTweetS【haresendSh/ar【eTwee/tSharesendM【oreHid\eSh/areSendShareSh【\ar【eShareSendShareShareYou m\i/ght【/ also lik】e \ \ 【 /Rain, flood【s and confused se\als: Inside/ An】\tarcti】ca's warmest-ever summ/e】r 】 \ / \ 】 / C】limate migrants: How even\ rich Bavaria ca/nnot provide sh】elter from glo/bal warm】in\g 】 【【 / 】 【 】 Living i【n \a ghos\【t town: Mee/t the Moldovans w/ho refus\e t】o b】e climate m【igra【nts 】 【 M\ore abou】tGlobal warmi/ng and /climate changeEnvironmental pr/otectionEcologySeaJordanHot TopicLearn more about \ Global 【warmin【g an\d climate change Hot TopicLear\n/ mo】r】】e about Global warming and clima【】te change / Browse today's【 tags5dxZ

gNbnSea chan/ge: how one small str/etch【 of c】o【【as\tline \in Italy transformed it【self \MXyU

tROIWi\th/ the Europ\ean Union’s】 focus on the climate action and the EU\ G【reen D\eal, Commissioner \for Envir【on】ment, Oceans【 and F【is/h/e【ries \Virginijus Sinke/vič/;ius is la【unching a /new/ 【Global Coalition for Bi【odiversit【y\ at Wor【ld Wild Life Day in】\【 Monaco.The youngest Com】missio】ner at the Eu\ropean Union, Lith】uanian S【inkevi&【#2/69;ius was a member of \Lithuania【n【 Parliament and Minister of the /Ec【/onomy and In\】no【va/tion o【f the Republic of Lithuania be【fo】re t【aking the p】ost a】t t】he E【uro】pean Commission.【Now charged with finding European solu\tions to the worsening /c】limate and ecological crisis, he spoke to Euronews' busine】ss edito【r,\ Sas】ha Vakulina about what is re】qu\ired to turn climate change and bio【d】【】ivers【ity\ loss around.Tell us【【\ a b【it more a】bout th【e Global Coalition for /Biodiversity and 】what is its role\ wh【en/ it comes to the bigger E\U e/n/】vironment】】al agenda?\I think we hav】e a\chieved\ terrific succes\s 【in rec【【e【nt years launching/ similar campai/gns on marin\e litte\r, on plast\【ic pollution in our oceans. Now ha】vin】g【 \thi/s year/ 】being devote【d to biodiversity, it is time to\ raise awareness about /biodiversity loss. The science is very 】】clear:/ 【out of 8 million as/】sesse\d – /1 mi\llion are at risk of extinction. We ha\ve to halt biod/】iversity loss caused /by 【the human activ】ities. \The b】e【st tool to /do so is a societ/y which is mobilized, which supp【orts certai【n decisions, which leads us to me\et/ing ho【pefully in Oc/tober/ in China【 /to 【r】each a global 【agr//e/ement equal t】o t\he P】aris \Accord reached in 201】6.And latest Euro-bar】ometer 【shows us 94% o【f Europeans care about environment【 /\p【r/otectio】n\ – 【it is a clear signal for politicians to【 act. A】nd I am tru【l\y p/roud that the】 European Commissio\n did so from t\he very \first days, introducing our flagship initiative &ndash\】; the Eur】opean Gr/een Deal.With the bi/g social movement over the past year, i/ncluding Frida\ys fo】r Fu】\tur【e, there has been a big focus on/ the climate /and /ecological crisis. Should【 focu/s shift to/wards【 biodi\/vers【【ity?【To\ b\e honest we don\&rsq【uo;t need \to c】\h\ange t\he】 focus. Climate change is \important and significa】nt 【to be a/ware of. And I a【m 【truly happ【y th】at we\ finally reached the】 point that w//hen you ask people in t/he \st/reet, they w\ill explai】n climate change to you. I think we have to do the same great work raising awareness about \biod】iver/s\ity. Because\ if y】ou lo/ok at the solution for stopping climate change/ and/ glob/al warming, on/\e third/ of it i/s in having a healthy ecosystem of biodiv【/ersity【 &n】d\ash; healt/【hy 【oceans\, seas, la】nd】】【, forest - everythin/g around\ us is/ biodiversity】】. 】And, of course, th】ose 】specie\s whi【c【h not o【nly 【keep o【ur nature alive, but also put food on our】 table【】s.The Eu】ropean Union has clearly put 【the Green D】e】al on】\ top on its age\nda. What is the 'blue' element \of the bigger Green\ 】Deal Pict】ur/e?That is 】correct. P【art of my\ work is to make the Green deal blue. By【 protectin】g biodiversit【y we canno【t speak only about protecting sp\ecies or\ protectio/\n of l/and, soil or fores】t. We【 also have to address oceans. That is \why this year it is/ going t】o 【be c【rucially important /】\to als】o reach a global agreement on \/protection of the high seas】,\ which today, \is not being ful/ly implemented.EU budget talks o【r M\ult】ia\nnual /Fin/a//ncial Framework (MFF) \talks are on/ /amid pr】essu【re for more climate action. What are 】your expectations a/nd what 】are your priori\ties th\】a【t/ y\ou want to see fr】om the MFF?】F【irst o\f all, pro【bably, the Commissi【on would like to see agreement. We /can/no【t a//fford delay and that would be, pro】bably, /th\e worst outcome.S】econdly,】 】o】f course, if /we \are to seriou\sly step \u\p effort on biodive】rsity protectio】n, on t/he Green Deal, it has【 to be su】fficien】tly funded. I a】m glad to see that that call\ has 【been heard【, bu\t most imp】ortant】】 is th\e part on subsidies. S【ubsi【【die】s, payme/nts\, which \go directl【y from/ the EU budget, fro\m different en/velope/s – they 】also have to /be in\】 line 】with the 】Gree/n Deal and the/y can】not enhance】 biodiversity loss or stimulate climate change.W\e have \to be sure that/ certain activ/i\ties do/\n’t cause environmenta\l loss, because it \would be ve\/ry strange if on the\ one han/d we increase【 】funding for b】iodiversity pro/t】ection, but on the other hand we fund certa【in \a】ctivities /that cause biodiversity lo【ss【.Y【ou’/ve touc\hed upon challenges and the i/mporta】【nt thi】n【\gs t/o do this year, what a【bout th\e Brexit s】】itu\ation when i】t comes to fisheries/【?Ne】go【tiations \just started and w\e are ready to t】alk. And I think if we are going to】 have a d\ialog【 where we/ are ready to mee/t each other, we a【re\ going 】to h】ave\ /a result tha】t is satisfying to all. The most imp【or【tant rea/lly 】i【s to com/e】 with \willingne\ss to find an /agreement.The /Fisheries agreement is th【e only one th【at's time bo\und, /it is a 【very short time. Let/’/s begin.\【 We a\re ready,\ I know the B\ritish /side as well. We 】will work tirelessly to find the best agreement/.【As a\【 former Mi/nister for the Economy and\ 【Innovation \in Lithuania, how does t/his 】experien/ce influence your job now as EU Co/mmissioner for Environment, Oceans and /Fisheries?On】e of t\he\ key \initia/tives tha/t we a\re g】oi/ng 【to a】/nnounce on the 11 March is t\he 】Cir【cular\ 【Economy A】\c\ti\on pl\an. It has various elements fro】m product policy to business 】and small/】 and medium enter】prise/ (SME) in【volvement. Beca/use if we are successful 【in imple\menting a \c/ircular econ\omy and 】changing\ current economic activities, if we to manage decoup\le grow【th from extract】i/on of resources, we can be very s【ucces\sful at halting biodivers】it】y loss. Bec【ause biodiversity loss is mainly【 due to extractio\n of resources which put enor/mous pr\essure on o】ur envi【】r【onment.T】h/ere is this aspect of transitio/【n 】a【s well when it comes 【to these\ new】 polic/ie【s. 【What is your\ take/ on that\?It i\s v/】ery \im\portant and \from the very b【eginning the【 Commi/ssion was vocal t\hat n\obod/y can be left \behin/【d.】 It i\s imp【ort】ant to mention that G】r】ee】n 【Deal i【s a g】rowth st】rategy 【and 】growth m\eans not t【o hold the amb】ition, but also help those, who are still not the】re. \An】d I think】 】the Green Deal can only be successful by/ having eve/ryone on board.An\d the final question, /you are the youngest commis【【sioner. How/ does th】】at influence your \polici\es?I a【m【 very open to communicate with everyone, wi\】th 】every Europ\ean citiz【en】 w/ho cares. 【And I think my role is to \/【raise awar/eness and 】to d\eliver./Share this articleCopy/】p】aste the article video embed link below/:Copy】ShareTwe】etSharesendShareTweet\/SharesendM\/ore\】HideShar【eSendSh【areShareShareSendShareShar】eYou 【【might also like 】 \ "No single co\untry w】ill be left behind in t】his crisi【】s&q\uot; says【 EU Commissioner for Internal Market / 【 【 / / \【 】 Fiscal support to non-Eurozone countr】ies a p】ossibil\ity as 】bloc backs\ ma【ssive coronavir【us 】rescue plan 】 【 / \ \ \【 Cor/on【avirus: an unpr】ecede/nted c】hallenge to de\mocracy? / 【 More aboutEnvi】ronmental prot】ec】tionE【U Com\missionE\uropean 】politicsMon\aco 【 Browse today's tags76GK

k4RkServing e\nvir\onmental awa/reness2LGA

Kx7p\This week, in a quiet street\ in【 the Norwegian har【bour town o【f Bergen, officials from E】U member states \【an】d No【rway/\/ will hole up in the\ Fisk【【er/idirektorate】t, or Fisheries D\irectorate, to decide the size of the fish 【pie to【 get divided \out between them from so-called &【ld】quo;shared \stocks.” This &ldqu【o;consulta】tion,” as /it is known, happ\ens a【way from pub】l/ic scr/utiny. Yet】, fishing indu/st】ry l【obby【ists are a【llowe/【d i/n where they get to 【cosy up t】o d\elegat【es, while civil so】ciety re/presentatives are 】- qu\ite l】itera【lly - /left out in the cold. These】 annual gat/herings are even more secretive th/an the【 EU AGRIFISH \council meetings, which were re【cently【 investigated by th【e E/U 【Ombudsman 【and found to/\ be】 /】lackin【g in transparency.EU-Norway【 consultations c/o/nsiste】ntly res\】ult in agree////me\nts to /continue overf【/i】shing. T】his is in no s\\mall part d\ue to a be\wilde\ringly flawe【d a【pproach】: by assuming the scienti【fi】c advice fo【r maximum】 sustai【【nable c【at【【che【s a\s a /s\tart\ing point and then negotiating upwa】】rds. /The 】EU \commit\ted to phase out overfishin/g【【 u\nd】e【r the r/ef】orme】d/ Common【 Fish】eries P/olicy (CFP【) by 2\【015 or, at the absolute\ 【l/atest, by 20. Ye】t【 while the act of catch】】ing\ too many fis】h occurs at\ sea, it is insi\de meetings like/ t/h】is /【where overfishing is \shamelessly agreed up/on and a】pproved\.On 16 Decembe\r in Brussels, EU fisher】ies ministers【 will follow】 up on 】the Norway \“consultations” at the an】nual AGRIFISH Co\uncil meeting, 】where quotas/ f\【or 】/the 【Nort】h East Atlantic w/\ill be fought over into the wee hours \of the night】/. Acc/ording to all the signs, \this year they will again agree\ to overfish several key stocks.The 【recen/t gro/und-breaki/ng IP】/BES Global Asses】sment Report on Bi】od/iversity and Ecosystem Services e【stimated 【humanity is threa【ten【ing a million species with extin【cti【on. Over/fis【hin】g rem/ains the bigges/t imp【act on our【 o/cean. Rebecca【 Hub】bard 】 【 】 \Programm\e Di【\rector at Our Fish The sig/nals? F\】i/sheries ministers /【/have s【\et fishing quo/tas abo【ve\ scie/ntif【i【【c a/dvice in six ou\t of every 10 c【as】es since the CFP was reformed i\n 2013. Th\e AGRIFI/SH Council v【ery rarel【y 【sets fishing quotas at more sustainable leve】ls than the EU Commission proposes. The 【EU】 Commission’s pro\posal for a number of\ North Eas】t Atlantic fish populations for 202【0 are a】lread\y above the scientific a/】dvi\ce, and the c【ontinu】ed politi\cal/ delay \】from\ fisheri】es m】inist/【ers has wors】ened the situ\ation, me【an【ing ministe【rs/ \are now fa】ced 】wi/【th【 proposal/s for dr】ast【ic cuts to some fish such as\ the iconic North S【ea cod.Not on//ly are mini】sters presid】ing over fishing/ limi/ts for/ a declining number of 【fishers\, they are overseeing 【the/ on\going decline of our marin【e resou【rces /instead of making sustainable 【resource mana/gement dec\i\sions 【that would improve the health of th【e ocean and/ secure the futur\e of f【isherpeople an/d 】coastal 】communities.T【\he recent gr\ound-brea\k/ing IPBES Globa\l Assessment Report on Bio】diversity an【d Eco【s【ystem \Services 【【estimated humanity\ is thre】atening a /mi\llio/n species with extinction.\ It also conc】lu\ded that the b】iggest threats \to na】ture are f【rom change】s to l】and\/sea use and over-exploitation. Overf/\ishing\ remains the 【bi【ggest \impact【 on our ocean.But re【m】】oving \the impact/ of overfishing\/ can restore oce/an health /and inc【r】ease/ \its capacit/y t/o m/itigat\e, an\d a【d【a【p\t to, the impacts of climate/ change【. It is therefore a key form/ of c【limate action. This has starte\d to permeat【e in】to p】olicy\. On 19 November【, the EU Council\, i\】n response t【o t/he 】recent/ IPCC Special/【 Report on\ the O\c/ean 】and Cryosphere, appe\ale/d to the EU Commission for policy options in t/he new Gr\een Deal, wh\ile st【a】t】ing the need for 【urgent action 【to \addres】s】 the incr\easin】g threat of climat/e b/r】eakdown to【 the o】\cean an【d marine l】i】fe.So, missing【 the deadline of 20/2/0 puts the EU in di/fficult territory\. It【 places EU fisheries 】ministers in direct】 cont\ravention of/ th/e 【laws that they【, or the【】ir pr/edecesso【rs, 【created a/nd signed up to, and in poten/tial conflict with the】 climate a】ction taken by othe【r ministries within their\ own gove\rnments.When EU fisheries】 】】ministers set annual\ f】\ishing l/imits 【for 2020 on 16 and 17 Decemb/e【r, they must/ deliver on internati/onal/ an/d EU obligations t【o 【end /overfishing. 】 Rebecca Hubbard / Programme Dire\ctor at O\ur Fish 】 / Norway, to】o, h\as inv\ested】\ a great【 deal in/ pro【jectin【g itself \as\ a climate and anti-overf【is【hing cha\【mp/ion,/ when in actu/al f】【act, it/ too, is hypocrit\ical 【on both is\sues】【. On climate, Nor/wa\y 】has made big commitments】 】to become a ‘l\ow-carbon 【so【c【iety&rsq】u/o; but in reali/ty, emi】ssions are decreasing much slower. On】 ov】erfishing, Norway signed up\ to the 【Sustai【nable Development Goals】 【to en/d overfis/hing by 2020, bu】t on【 the water, they received a quota in 2019 large enough to plunder a massive 164,000 tonnes of fish above s\cientifical】/ly advised sust\ainable level\s (equivalent to 21% of its share/d s/toc\k quota with the E【U).W/hile N】orway\ and the EU discus【s h\ow best】 to continu\e ove\rfishing in Bergen】, further south, delegates at the COP25 climate meeting in Madrid focus【 on the ocean, 【in what has been labelled the “Blue COP.&rdq/u/o; With states under pressure to ste/p up their commitments to action on climate, discus\sions will be focusing】 on why there is not more ac/t【ion on oceans【 when【 we know what needs to be done. And it ca】n be done relatively quickly/, a\s 】the longer-【term (but cr】【itical) ac】tion\ of slashing car\bon emis】sions gets underway?Late】r th【i【s month, EU prime min【i\sters】 have an op】portu】nity to g\o public with a】 cle/a/r and \deliverable climate emergency acti/on. W】hen E/U fisher【ies min【isters】 set annual fis\hing limits for 2020 \o】n 16 and 17 December, they must de】liver on int】e【rnat【ional and EU o】bligations to/ end overfishing.Rebecca\ Hubbard i\】s t/he Progra\mme Direct\or/ at Our Fis【h.____________Are you【 a recognised expert\ in you/r field】? At E【uronews,/ we belie】ve all views matt\er. Co\n】t\act us at view@euronews.com to send pitches or submis/sions and be【 p/ar/t of the con】/versation.Share this articleShareTweetSh\aresendShareTw/\eetSharesendMoreHideShareSendShareShar【eSha】reSe\【ndShareShareYou might also/ like //】 \ / The EU’s G【reen】 Deal p/\lan/s to /restore nat\ure mu/st include our largest e/cosystem - th】e ocean ǀ /Vie【】w 【 / \ 【 \ / 】 】 Scien】t\ists have\ emb\arked from Norway【/ on the lo/ngest-ever exped\itio/n to the 】Arctic / / \ 【 \ \ \ How s/mall sca\le fi\sheries saved Da【nish f】ishi/ng communities Mor】e aboutf【/ishingNorwa/yEuropean U/nionFisheryEnvironmental protectionCOP /5 M】a\drid Browse today's tags1Vo8

IqL5Now the【】 blame /game \over Brexit appear【s to be in f\ull swing, in Brus/se【ls, they'r】e \starti【ng to kis\s goodby\e to the idea of /an orderly exit by th/e UK on October t/he 31】st."T\o 【put things v】ery fra【nkly \and t\o t\ry and be object】ive, on this parti\cular 【point, we are not r【eally i】n a position where we are/ able /to\ find an agreement."Ea】rlier in the day the EU Commi】ssion spokesperson 】tweeted that emotions are running high, but that the EU】 wants a 】deal.Also i/n town】, suppo】r/ter of a unified Ireland, Sinn F&eacut\e;in's Mi\chelle O'Neill from Northern I【reland. C/oncerne【d about the UK【's sugges【tion of cu【stom】s chec/k】s】 to re】place to c】ontroversial Ir/ish backsto【p."We’re here to make the case f【or /why I/reland nee/ds to be protected. /We【&rs\quo;re /h/ere /to ma】ke the case for o【【ur peace process/. Tha\nkfully, the】 Eu/ropean \Union has been co【nsistent t/hroughou/t the Brexit debate in standing up for the Goo【d】 Fr】/iday 】agreement, and we expect them to hold to th】at toward the end of this【 negotiation. Clear】ly we look li【ke we&rsquo【;re mo【ving toward a clif】f /edge\ Br】exit."T】he UK's Brexit secretary Stephen Barclay will 】spen【d Thu/rsday in 】B/russ\el】s with his【 /EU counterpart /Michel Ba【rn【ier.Talks r\es【umi\ng \amid fadi/ng hopes 【\for comp】romise【s 】on either sid\e."On the whole, the escalting communicat\ion\ \hasn'【t\ been very helpful and i thi】nk it\ has /damaged goodwi【ll and【 the lit】tle\ bit of trust that was l【eft," says Larissa Burner - European Policy Centre.Pressure【 on /Boris John】son the【n】 in/ the\ run u\p next week's summit of】 EU lead】ers.It'll be h\i/s first 】visit【\ to/ Brussels as prim/e ministe】r and the 27 other E】U leaders will col【lectiv\ely \gri/l\l him on what's【 he had【【 to say.Share this ar【ticleCopy/paste 】the article \video embed\ lin】k【 below:Co/pyShare/Tw】eetSh【ares\endSha/reTweetShare\sen】dMoreHideShareSendShareShareShareSen/dShare【ShareYou might also like 【 \ / 【 T\he week in Euro\pe: 【how is the bloc faring in t/he coronavirus fight? /】 /】 】】 【 / Green mayor calls /】for Pari\s to ban outdoor heaters amid \CO】2 concerns 【 \ / 【\】 / The \B/rief: fund】i】ng Europe�】39;/s green ambit【ions / More/ abo】utCl】imateE\nvironmental pro】tectio/n】Fossil fuelsHot 】Topi\cLearn more about Climate Ho】t Topic\Learn mo/re abou\t Climate \ 【 【/ Browse toda】y&#/039;s t【agsoj07

bop8Synth\e【tic palm oil being brewed like【 beer gets B】ill Gates'【】;/ investment 【KWtV

0kfTTe/xt si【zeAaAa‘Tis the seas】on to be snowy. Ac【c【ording to\ researc】h by【 Club Med, sustainable, pl\an【t-based 】materials will be the newest trend in\ the\ ski worl/d come 2020.The research emerges as demand for plant-based food i/ncreases year on year, wi\th more c/onsum\ers /choosing ve】getarian and vegan /opti/ons on a weekly basi【s. There has be【en a 39% surge 【in p【lant-based【 eat/ing in Eur/op【e an\d in the】 US,\ /A\m】er】ic】an consumers \purc/has【ed 228 million pla【/nt-【base\d burgers 【between Janu】ary and Ma【y this year.It’s no won】der the【】 ski industry is followi】ng suit, with winter\ hol\iday provider【 Club Me】d stating peop】le want more fro/m their c【lothing and】 an emphasis o【n “ethi】cal ski fa【shio\n.”Accor】ding to \predictions, snow wear will increasingly be made from synthetic a【nd plant-based fa【brics wh】ich are made from soy】beans and/ hemp. /This is/ t\ha\nks to 75% o】f co\nsum【ers wan/ting to m【ake more eco-fri/endly ef【forts to prevent 【c【limate change and more than a third of on\l/ine shoppers \making stricter purchases.Plant-based do【wn/ ski ja】ckets and no\n【-leathe【r boa boots/ are 【f\ore\c/】ast dominate the market/. The jackets will b【e nice and snug\, but cruelty-fr\ee,【 and【 bo/ots wi】ll n\o longer be mad/e using leather. Instead, v\egan alternatives will be on offe/r and 100% GOTS (global o\/\rganic textil】e st/andard) certified organ/ic wool gloves and hats will also be /p\opu\lar.The same study al/so predi\cts tha/t sk\iwear will be revampe】d from a technologica】l perspecti\ve too. We\ will /see the adv/ent【\ of Bluetooth gloves】,/ Ultra HD Smar【【t cameras and ice-repellent snow boots to enhance performance 】in 2020. Overall, skiiers【 are n】ow after better p】erformance, im/proved safety and a sus【tainabilit/y element to \the products 】th/ey are purchasing. Estelle Gi\raudea/u, Manag/ing D/ir】ector UK & 【Northern Europe/ at Club Med said\,&】ldquo;This is /【a/n ex\citi\ng ti\me f/or ski fashi【on. O】【ver the d【\eca///des we have se/e\n clothing】 brands develop exciting new products and wit/h technology advancing】 at suc】h a fast rate, we expect even /more advancements to come.&\rd/quo;T\he【 best eco-friendly skiwear av\ailabl】e no【wEXA Jacket, Pict】u\re Organ【ic Ski\wear, €2【65Picture Organic are a B Corp certified skiwear brand 】with a firm focus on sustainable 】practi】】ce and fabrics. E【ve】ry【 aspect of t【heir /busin【es】s\, from/\ \sou/rce 【m/aterials to \p/ackaging, is tr【anspare/nt and envir\/onmentally-frie/ndly. For ins【tance, they reject the traditional way of /making snow ja【ckets which requi/res pe【trole【um ext\raction. 100% of their prod/uc】ts use【 org/anic, 】rec【ycled an【d bi】o-sourced mater/ials. The EXA jacket is made f【rom 64% r【ecy【cled/】 polyeste】r\ and durable PFC-/free water-repellent treatment, but \does/n't co/mpromi/se on warmth or bre/athabili/ty. These【 de【【sig【ns\ are our f【av】ourite【s. EXA \JacketPi/\cture Organic S】kiwearOpen One 3L Shell Pan\【ts, Openwear, &eu】ro;】329Op\】enwear combi/ne high【 functionality with ethical pr【oduction, /【sus【\tainable\ mat】erials \an】d honesty. Th】e company was f/ounded on the pri【nci】ples of community and t/r【ansparency by Ma【rt\ijn Jeg/erings and /produces stylish, h/ighly f】unctiona【l【 skiwear. Out\erwear is ma/de from eithe\r recy】cled nylon or r】/\ecycled PET bottles】 and \all prod【u】cts bo】ast 20K waterp【roofness. \We love the/se shel/l pants, which come /in four colours.Open One 3L Shell/ PantsOp/enwearMen's\ Pow\der Bo\wl Jacket/,\ Patagonia, €44 (£【;38/0【)Patagonia'\s ski range is world-renow\ned【, offering durable, win\dproof protection and guaranteed warmth. The outdo】or brand has i\mpressi】ve su】stainable】 cred【enti\als, au】diting the/ mater【ials and metho/d/s used,\ taking responsi【【\【bility for the ent/ire life cycle 】of prod\ucts an【d e\xamining h】/ow 【th【ey use resources at our buildings 】an】d facilities.The Pow\d】er 【Bowl Jacke/t is built with /a 100% re\cycled p\ol\【】yeste\】r GORE-TEX face /f【abr【ic a\nd is Fair Trade Certified™ sewn. The questio【n is【, Peppergr【as\s Gre】en or Bal【kan Blue?M】en's 】Powder Bowl JacketPatagoniaS\hare this article\ Mor【e from\】 styleVM3F

jbVBTe】xt 】si/zeAa/AaThe Danis【h retail\ entrepreneu【r/ and philanthro/pis【t Anders Holc【h Povlsen is already Scotland’s larges【t\ private \land owner. Now he /is/ submitt/ing plans to\ bui/l/d a new】 tourist hub in 】a rem】\ote Highl【and town, amid protest from locals who claim sm】all\ busi\nesses will be driven【 out./The proposed /tourist attraction would be erected in the s\mall village of T【ongue, loca/ted halfw/ay up\ 【the/ sce】nic 【No【r】th Coas】t\ 500 touring route. Tong【ue 【already\ comprise】s of a yo\u\【t\h host\el, craft shop, gen/eral\ \store and \gara/ge, a bank, a 【post off】ice【【 and two hotels.For Povlsen, who【se\】 n/et worth is in the regi/on of €8 billi\on, the goal 】is to/ creat【e a community 【【space in what is des【c\ribed as a “lo/st” a】rea 】of the Highlands【.Anders】 Holch PovlsenAPBo AmstrupThe live planning application/ is being put【 foward 】by Wildland Lim\ited, P】ovlsen】’s self-】m\ade conservation project, wh/ich aims to ad【vance the “sustainable/ 【development of some of Scotland’s most ru\gged, precious and/ 】beautiful landscapes.”What will the】 new village\ be like】?If approv】ed, the vi\llage to\ be【\ called ‘Bur//r’s Stores&rsq】uo;, will consist\】 of 【a /range of amenities inc【luding a】 rest】aurant,】 bakeh】ouse, a shop sellin\g local and se\asonal prod\uce, an even】ts space,【 accommodation】 for staff an\d visitors, new fuel pumps and】 a microbrewery.Acc\ordi/ng to T/\he Heral【d Sc【o】】t\la\/n\d, 】su】ch plans would 】&l【dquo;transform【” /the village and &】ldquo;restore the area to its f\or/mer glory \[]\ whi/le maintaining【 its h\istor\ic c【harac】ter/.&rdquo】; U/nder】 design【\ princ】iples in the/ plann】【ing ap\pl】/ication\, Wi\ldland Limited also claim that the village will “be s【ustainable 】\and respect the n【atural beau/ty” of the area and\ prior/itise /pedestrians.Vision of the/ villageWil】\dland Limite\dEve】nts space for c/\ultural/live music eventsWild】l【\and LimitedBurr'【s Stores 【pr】】opose\d imagesWi\ldland LimitedWill the\ plan/s negatively affect local bus【iness/es?So far, Tongue, Melness and Skerray Co【mmunity 】Council, Kyl/e 】/of Tongue /Hostel and the Ben Loya【l Hotel have a【ll object\ed the plans. “This is n】ot\ fair comp】et【iti】on for other accommodatio\n providers i】n the area 【and will d/irectl\y d/isplace\ business from 】us and other providers,&\rd/quo; 】Suza】\n\ne Mackay,】 【owne/r of\ the Kyle /of\ Tongue Hostel】 and H\olid/ay P\ark, to【ld the Daily M/ail.&ldquo/;Tr】ying to\ compete with a company that has no nee\d to m\ake /a profit is uns/u\s【tain\able,” ag】rees /Sarah Fo】/x from the 】B/en Loyal Hotel.Wil【dland L【imited 】tells Eurone\ws Living that this wil【l in no way be a \tou【rist &lsq】uo;resort’ and is rather a “collection of sensitive【ly re\s\【tored buildin】gs,/ which may house c【afes, small retail\ers and c\o【mmunity spaces.”Highlands, Sc\otlandU【nsplashIn r/esponse to complaints, a spokesperson fro】m】 the/ company co【mmen【ted “we are 【act/ively lis\tening to the views of【 \the com\muni/ty.” They adde】d, “the revitalisati\on of this part of the village w【ill, of course, be a highly colla/\borative effort, with a strong focus】 on complementing Tongue&rsq】/uo;s already】 estimabl\e visitor attr】a】ctions.&rdqu】o\; Ultimately【, &】ldquo;l\eaving this\ site/ to become dereli\ct/ is\ not a【n option,”】 they concl\uded/.The planning document\ states that facil】ities /for both tourists and locals will &/【ldquo;n\ot negative【ly 【】impact 【upon ne/ighbourin】g b】u】【sinesses.”【When asked about h【is conservation p/ro\jec/ts by property cons\ultanc】y Knight Frank, Povlse【n co【mmented, /&ldquo/;you/ might call it philanthropy, 】I\ prefer to think of /it as investing in the natural】 world.”Sha【re this\/ articl\e 【 More from/ pla】cesWjjF

0UlEThe ef\fort to end pla\stic pol/lu】tion in our oceans was /one of the【 /【key th】【emes of 2018, \wi【th Europea\n【 Un【io\n lawma【kers \ending the ye【ar with an \agr【eement to ban【 certai】n single-use 【plas】tics by 2021.Mic【r】opla/stics c】an 】affe】ct microscopic animals' ability to feed and the【】】ir ability to repro/\】duc【e Dr Matt /Cole 【/ Marine Plas【tics/ Re】search Scientist,】 Plymouth M\arin/e Laborato/r【y /Be/l】gian 】MEP Fr&eacu/te;d&eacut】e;\rique【 【Ries 【is behind the law, and t】【old Euron【ews: "Th/e balloon \sticks, the stirrers, the cotton buds, the straws, the 】plates are going to be b【anned】. And 】why \are \they going to be banned?【 Beca【u】【se t【he【y \a【re the /a\rticles that you mostly f\/ind on our beaches, /and/ on/\ our oceans, and becaus【e 【there are alternatives."A【 central issue in the single-use plastic ban is who is going to pay. The new European di/rective means fishin/g ge\ar \manufacturers will/ be】ar the cost\s of collecting ne/ts lost at】 sea, rather than the f/is/hermen.】The 】s【ame k【ind of principle is【 \being 】applied to the tobacc/o \industry and its \plast\【ic\ cigarette ends.However industry body Pla】sti\csEurop【e argues the responsibility/ should be sh】ared more widely.Executi/v\e Direc】\tor Karl Foerster explained\ th【eir posit】ion to Eur【one/w/s【: "We make the raw material, so that's our responsibili/ty, t/hen you have somebody t【hat makes /the product, then you have the c【onsum【er b/rands/ that p\】ackage any food in it, t【he people consume 【it and b\uy it \in a re/tailer, so you see t【he\re a\re many 】play【ers that are invo/lved i/n the life-cycl】e of a product\."An estimated 8 million tonnes of 【p】/last\ic waste end【s up in \th】e\】】 oce/ans every year. 】The EU's ban is【【 significant in terms o\f s】/etti\ng a policy precedent, /but it won't \change\ the seas ver【y 】much, as/ 90% of the p\la】s/tic pollution is【 believed to com/e from 10 rive【rs - 8 in As/ia, /and \two in Africa."The plastics become micro\plastics in \the oceans and ar\e eaten by marine animals. 【Dr Ma】tt Cole, a Marine Pla】stics R/es\earch Scie\nti\st at P\lym】outh\/ M\ar\ine Labo\ratory, tol【d \Euronews that all【 creatures gr【eat and small are affected. "What we've been able to identify (is) t\hat in very small plankt/onic microsco/pic animals, that the microplastics can/ effect their ability t\o feed,/ their a【bil/ity to\ re/produc【e and also their sur/vival," he 【says. "Other \researchers have d/one th\e same/ kind of work on oys】ters, mus\cles and fish, and also 】shown vario/us negati/ve impacts that th】ese plastics ca/n have on】 these animals."Along【【side】 the sin【gl/e【-use plast/ic【s// ban there are other\ e【fforts being made to sol【ve the p/roblem.This ye【ar/ The Ocea/n 】Cleanu/p deployed thei\r first system aime\d at catching large\r plastic【 w\a】ste in the Pacific for recycl/ing.Jou\rnalist name • Jeremy WilksShare this articleCopy/【paste the article \video embed link below:Cop【yShar/eT】weetSharesendShareTweetSharese\ndMore/H】i\deS】hareSendSh/areShareSh】areSendS】hareShar【\】eYou might also】 like 【 /】 \ 】 \ 【 I【ta【lian ban【 o/n plastic cotton 】buds 【comes into ef/fect 【 】 \ 】 】 / \ 【 【 Scotland bans si\ngl【e-us\e coffee cups in gov【ern【ment buildings【 】 / 】 \ Greenpeace: Single-use pl/astic\ h【as to stop 【 \ More aboutEco/l\ogyEnvironmental protectionPollutionEuropean politicsplastic【 Browse today's ta【gsdBme

Q2DB“Time is running o/ut”, stres\sed Carolina Schmidt, Chi】l\e’s Environ【men\t and Climate Minister, /in a /】video 【ad\dress before 2019&】rsquo;s Cl】/imate Conference COP25 la\st Decembe【r. &ldqu【o;There can【n【ot be 】an effe/ctive】 global res\ponse/ to clima\te cha\nge withou\t a global response o】n\ ocean/ i/ssues,&rdquo/; she added.】 Ocean issues range widely, fr【om sea【-level rise a\nd lo【ss【【 of 】oxygen, to incr】eas/ed water temperatures and ch【anges thr/ou/ghout e】cosys【te】m【s. The Inte【rgovernmental 】Pane\l 】for /Cl/imate Chan【ge&rsquo/;s (IPCC) sp【ecial report on the s\tate// of the oc】ean\s f/eatures worrying future t\rends, while last 】year\, the heat in the oceans saw the highest value/ /ev】er recorded.Ocean aci】di【f\ica】tion 【u【ndermines the integrity of m【arine ecosystemsOcean a\cidifi【c】atio】n is the phenomenon in wh【ich o/ceans are becoming】 mo/re/ acidic, as they /conti【nu】e to a【bsorb more and 】more of carbo】/n in the atmosphere/, which is【 increasing due \to h】uman-produce】d emissions. In the】 last 200 years, about 30 percent【 of those\ total emissions have\ been gu】lped by\ the ocean, and 】today, sea wat/ers st\ill/ take in a【bout 25【 percent annually.Ocean acidification occurs when seawater rea【cts/ 】w】i【th the CO2 it ab【\sorb【s from t/he 】/atmosphe/【re, prod】ucing// 【more acidity-【inducin】g chemicals while redu【ci/ng important 】minerals - such as calcium c【\arbonate - that marine organisms rely on to /survive】.The oceans’ average s】urface ac/idity, ra【ther stable over millions of years, h\as increased by about 26 percent i】n the last 150 years. “It】 【was a very slow rise unt/il the 1950s, but】 from /then on\wards, acidif】icatio/n gained spee】d,&r】dquo【; sa\ys Dr. J【ean-Pierr/e Gat【/tu\so, researc】\h di】r\ector at the Laboratoire d'Oc&eacut\e;a【n/ographie de Villefranch】\e, CNRS and 【the】 Univ【ersity】】 of Sorbonne. “Since man-m】ade CO2\ emiss【/ions are【 the/ main cause of /\acidification, fut】ure proj】ections depend on their 】levels. In a bus/】【ines】s-】as-usual si】tuation, ocea【n acidification c】ould /i/ncrease by anoth】【er 150 percent by 】2100,” a\dds\/ \Dr. Gattuso.With 9 perc/ent of th】e ne\ar-surface ocean affe】cted by fa】lling p】H, aci\】dification eff】e\cts are incre/asing】ly felt globally,】 across【 a wide range of marine \ec】osystems. “The worl\/d seems to be/ ob【\sessing ab【out what is happening on land【【 and in the atmosphere, no【t realis【ing that li\fe on Ea/rth is wholly a 【s】ubsid】ia/ry of t】/he ocean, that 【a【ccounts for 98 【pe】rcent o/f species on the planet,” says Dr. 】Dan 【Laffoley, M/arine【 Vi/c\/e 【Chair 【on IU【CN&【rsquo;s Wor【ld/ Commission o/n Protecte【d Areas and【 Senior Advisor \Marine Science and Conse\rvation 【for its Global】 Marine and Polar Progr\amme. &ld【quo;What was/ predict\e】d [about acidification] back i\n 2004 as\ something we needed n【ot\ to w\orry abo\u/t until 2050 or 207The climat【e em】erg】e/ncy is 】no】t th/e【 only\ en【viron\】me【ntal issu\e th\e world【 i】s strug\/\gli】ng to solve. Plastic \products clog our ocean/s, /thre】atening /marine /life and poll【uting the water. At current rates plastic】 is predicted to outweigh all the f\ish in t/h】e sea by the \year 2050. In Holla/nd, a new device 【is a sm\all si】gn of 】hope.】 \'WasteSha/【rk' is a remotely /contro\lled device that 】co【llects rubbish 】from the water.Th】is m/ini-catamaran has been developed to remo【ve plastics and ot/h【er fl】oating debris from\ 【the sur\face of l【akes a【nd oceans/. Its sensors c【an moni/【tor pol】luti【on】 le\【v【el/】s a【n】d】 other environmental ind/icators. It 】is e/lectrically powered, emissio/n-free a】nd can collect hundreds of \kilos o\f rubbish at a /time. Ric/hard Hardiman is the \founder of Ranmarine Technologies, the comp\any responsible fo【r Waste Shark:"What【 we're tryi】/ng to do is cre/\ate a small enough vesse】l that will g【et into tight spac\es where wa/ste c】ol】lects, particularly in the harbours and the port【s,\ and s【top all that waste being take/n out in】to the grea/】ter ocean."I have】 a visio】n in 【my head that /keeps me 】going, that is】 you'd be sit\ting in a/ control room from our\ site 】we could se\e where /eve【ry drone is across/ the p】lane【t, how many\ \are o【perating, how much wast/e is being ca】ught and actually see the real im【pac\t of that these things are\ making a\round the world."\T/his is one of the 】proje\cts that receive/d su】pport from th】】e European funds allocated to】 making plas【t】ic circular. R【anmari/ne 【/is a\ Dutch startup \company and has already g\ot 【cust/o】m/ers】 in several countries. Tessa Despinic is its design en\gineer:"The basi\c function of /t/he】 WasteShark is very simple.【 【It just swims aroun】d and collects tra/sh f/rom the su/rface. 【But inside, it's always chan】ging, we're always try/ing to make 【it light【er, more efficie】nt/, easier to do mainten/a\nce on. And we【're also buil】ding \an autonomous v/ersion that w/ill s】wim a】round accord【ing\ to/ w【】aypoints /that y\ou give】【 it. So we're alw【ays wo/rking o\n that 【and /making】 it better/."Th/e Eu/ropean Union is l】eading the global fight against marine lit】ter. Besides its/ policies curbing single\-us\e plas/】tic【s and r\ed\ucing waste from l/ost\ fishing gear/, the EU ha】s earmarked 】350/ million Euro \【for research a\n/d de】velopment in this area.Watch Good /M/orni【n】g E\urope's report i\n the player\ ab/ove.J\ournalist/ \na\me • Joao Vitor【 Da Silva MarquesVideo editor • Joa】o Vitor Da Silva Marques】/Sha】re this \art\icleCopy/pas\te t/he a\rt/icle\ vi】deo embed link below:CopyShareTwe\etSharesendS/hareTw】ee】tSha\resen】dMoreHide/S【har/eSendShareShar\eShareSen【dS/hareSh【areYou might also like \ 】 C【OP25: C\hile summit/ withdrawa\l /hits tourism \b】/【u【t \opens new door fo\r environment\ a\ctivists / 】 /\ \ 【 / Is Blac/k Friday bad for/ the environment? Activists take on\ 【sh/opping【 fr【enzy 】 】 / C【ol】dplay to /pause touring, cit【ing environmental reasons / More aboutclima【te】 chang\ecli【】】】mate protectio/nClimate emergen【cyClim/a\te crisisEnvironm\ent polluti/onEn/vironmental】【】 protectionHot TopicLearn more about 】 climate chang】e Hot 【TopicLearn more about climat【e change \ Browse today's tags 【is happening now.&rdqu】/o;Cutti/ng /the water&/rsquo;s amount of carbo/nate i【ons】 robs a w【ide range of /mari】ne animals of the vita】l material t/hey n/eed t】o 【build protective shells. Mussels, pla\nkton, or\ reef \c】or】als are /some o】f the main sp\ecie/s u【/nder】 threat, multiple s【tudies show./Tropical 【coral reef\ ecosy】stems oc/cupy less t】han\ 0.1 per【ce/nt\ of the o【cea【n floor, but between on\e and/】 9 millio/n species live in and around them. As scientist/s p/\redict 】that calcium car\bonate 】】will drop by the end of【 t/h/e cen【tury, halv【ing its pre-industria\l con/centration across the tropics, /scientists a】re wo】rried that 【corals m\igh【t switch from building to dissol\vi/ng mode. While they might not shr】ink, oc/ea【n ac】idification a】lone 【might lower 】the densit【y of their s\kel】etons, by as much a\s 20 percent by 20. Aci/dific【ati】on weakens/ reef\s facing furth\er /p\ressures from b\leaching-\inducing heatwaves, \as well as economic act】iv/ities\. “We are/ w\eake】ning their repair mechanisms,&rdquo】; says】 D/r. Laff【ol\】e/y. \In【 the ne/xt 20 years, scientists s\ay that】 coral reefs /are lik【ely to degrade f】ast, chall\/enging the l\ivel/iho\o\ds of 0 million people depending \on th】em for food, coastal prote\ction and income.Acidification al/s【o affects deep-water corals\ – such 【as those in the North Atlantic &ndas】h; whi【ch are biodiversity hotspots, critical hab\itats for thou】sands of species,\ \including commercial ones, s】u\ch as shrimps, lobsters, cr\abs, groupers,/ and snappers. “Their skeletons are being eroded /in】】 the same manner as o\steop】or/os\is is weakeni【ng ou/r b\ones/【,” says Dr. Laffoley.A phe】nom/enon not yet\ \fully under】stoo\d\“There are observations of ho\w ocean acidificat【ion【 im\p/ac/ts certai/n species,\】” says/ Dr【. Helen Fi【/ndlay, biol【ogical o【ceanographer at the【 Plymouth Marine La【boratory (PML),\ which uses Copernicus Climate Cha【nge Servi【ce (C3S) data and 【infras\tru/cture to estim】ate the \ocean\】’s pa/st and fut\ure aci【d【ity. These impacts are m\ore often 【asso\ciated with ocean regions where 【deep waters &ndas】h; which 】naturally t/end to be more acidic &nda/sh; r/is/e to the surfac/e, boosting acidificati【on regionally, explains Dr./ \】F【i/ndlay. For instance, acidic w【at/ers d\ama\ge o【r d】【isso/lve the shells\ of plankt/onic 【sea snails, important feed for fish such as salmon.But /【s\tudies have show\n spec/ies can respond in mixed w】ays. Some might benefit from acidification, as well as f【rom ocean 】warming, and /inc【reasingly p/redate other sp【ecies,\ IP\CC experts cla/im. Across ecosystems, microscopic marine algae – 【or ph\ytoplankt/on, the b/asic feed /o】f many 【marine food webs/ &ndash】;【 【m/ig】\h】t suf\fer or flo】urish in more 【acidic seawater. Satellite 【data on ocean co【l【o】ur from the Copernicus Marine Se【rv【ice can provide【\ a closer look a\t the oc\ea/n&】rsquo;s 】C/O】2 uptake and how the marine food】 chain mig/h\t react.“Th】e Copernicus Cli/ma【te/ /Change (C3S) Marine, Coastal a/n/d Fisher】ies (MCF【) Sectorial Information System (SIS) project has【】 produced\ a series o】f marine envir】o\n】ment clim\/ate imp/\act/ indicators\, including several \re/lev\an【t to ocean ac\idification, a【long with a number of too【ls that demo【nstr/ate how th\e indicators can be used in marine applications,&rdq【uo; 】says Dr. James Clark, s】enior scientist at】 PML/【. “A majo【r goal of the project is /to produce a 【set of products that su\ppo\rt Eu\ropean climate change【【 adaptation str\ategie】s and mitigati【【on policies. Indica【tors from the CS-MCF project are being incorporated in【to the C】3S /C】limate Data【 S】tore, and a】re expected to 】g【o /live in the next few wee】ks.&】r【dq/uo;/Impac\ts on /biod/iversityEffects of the 】same】 phenomenon may take different faces across r【egion【s/. Throu/g【/h the mid-2000s, the U.S.&】r【squo;s Pacific Northwest began seeing dramatic】 oyster d/ie-o/f】fs in【 hatcheri【es, as th【\e larvae were affec】te【d by acid/】ifie【【d waters; the vital 【coastal shellfish/ industry was h/i/t\ 】hard. In Canada, scientists e/xpe】ct acidification\ on the Pacific c【oast to 】/give way to increasingly toxic algae】, compromisi\ng shel【lfish, and a】ffect\ing even fish, seabirds and marin【e mammals. 】They also anticip\ate one species of fish-killing a/lgae might wi/n more territo/ry in mo/re】 acidi\c wate/rs, threatening loc【al salmon aquaculture】.In Eur】ope, big mollusc producers】 on the A【tlantic 】】coasts】/ like Fran/ce, Italy, Spain, and the UK are 】expected t/\o 】suffer the most【 from acid】ifica】tion impacts by the 】end】 of t\he century. Data from \t\he Co【pern/icus Marine Se/\rvice, which recently includ\【ed sea】water】 pH am】【o\ng its】 ocean m/onit/ori\ng indicators】, is/ used】 by res【/ear\chers【 to gain a better under\stan/ding 】of how acidifi】cation evo【lves in 】European waters./Acidification effects in/ the A【r】ctic also worry scientists, some predicting that its \【waters wil\l lose its /shell-building ch\em】\icals by t】he 20/80s. Still, there are o】nly spotty measurements of oce】an【 acidification i】n the A\rctic, points o\ut Dr. Gattuso, due to its hars\】h rese/ar\ch condit/io【ns. \&/ldquo;W\/hat we do know】 is that /Ar【ctic wate/rs are natu\/rall/y mo【re【 a【/cidic – as CO2, li/ke \all gases, dissolves much faster in cold \water. We worry【 that in about 10 percen/t of the\/ A【/rctic’s o/cean s】urface, the 】pH is so low tha/t the \water is b】ecoming corrosive to organisms/ with shells,” says D/r. Gatt\us【o.Changes 【in ocean physics\ and chemistry a\nd impacts o】n organisms and ec/osystem service\】s according to /str/ingent 【(R【CP2.6/)/ an\d/ high bu【sines】s-as-usual 】(RC【/P8.5) CO2 emissions scena】rios.Source: Scie/nce Mag】 “The prob\lem【 is we are really asking for trouble by changing\ t\】he fu】nction\ality of the ocean,&r】dquo; says Dr. Laffoley, who highlights that 【th】e mix of acidificatio\n,\ ocean wa/r/ming an】d lo/ss o】f /oxyge【/n i\n the water】 is weake【ni】ng t【he overall system, with poorly u】nder【sto】od consequences. “The scale and the /amount【 of carbon a\nd h】eat going into the\ ocean is j】ust truly j】aw-dropp/ing. It&rsqu/o;s a\ proble【m that we 【are】 rather storing up than r】esolving it./” Reversing acidif】ication i/mpac/ts on ecosyst/ems?【“We have already\ commit】ted 【to ocea】n a【/c】idif\ication to its current levels and beyond【, through the amounts of】 CO2 emi/\tted,\” says Dr. 】Fin/dl】ay.】 &ldqu】o;T\he onl\y certain approach is mitigatin\g CO2 e【missions,\&rd【qu】o; say】s Dr. Gattuso. “It w\ill take\ a long time to go back to【 the preindustri\al stat/e, but we can /stop oce【an acidification./”Scie【【nce\ i【s exploring solut【【i【ons, but their 【effects on\ e【cosyst\ems and oce\an pr\oce\sses are not yet fully unders\tood. \Some oc\ean-based 【climate change fixes don/&rsq\uo;t t/arget directly oc\ean acidifi【】cation, while】 others might not be very efficient at\ lockin/g away the carbon. However, 【“more researc】h is being done 】to investiga\te ho】w 】we can use macro\algae, sea-grass b】eds, man】gr/oves, et】\c to st【/ore c】arb】on and also to lo【cally/ ease ocea\n acidi【fica/tion,” says Dr. Findlay\.Adapting fisheries to ease t/he pr【e/ssures o/n ecosystems 【may also provide a way to live with ocean acidification. For\ exampl【【e, 】C3S and PML are com\【】bining wh【at mod\el【s/ say abou【t potential ef\fects of 】c】【limate change on Europe/an s【eas with 】speci/es inf\ormation /to f\oresee how fish s/\toc】ks mig】ht /change/ and【/ how ind/【ustri\es and people depending\ on fisheri】es need to ada】pt./ /“The C3S data will】 be/ used to identify /areas of opportunity【, such as】【 increases in number\s of some fish species\, a【s we/ll as risks, such as dec/lining fish stocks\,&\rd】quo; says Dr. Clark.\ &】ldquo;As/ a\ \result, the sector will be able to mitigate the effects of climate change 【by p/lan【ning sustainable fi/shing practices./&/】rd【quo;Identifying which pa/rts o】f the【 oce】an need u【rgent conserv】ation cou\ld】 al【so help ecosystems mit】igate aci【dification. Experts have been map/ping c/ritical marine ecos】ystems to spot\ where protected\ areas should be /created or \exte\n/ded. &l/dquo;We can h/ave /places【 【where we take th】at\ pressure off, so we give/ areas of the oceans the be【st\ h】ope 【of ri\din【\g\ out the cha【llen\ges that they face \while we go ab/out reducing CO2 emissions,” s【ays \D】【r. La\ffoley.Share this /articleShareTw\/ee/tShares\endSha/reTweetShar/esendMore/Hide\ShareSendSh】areShare】ShareSendShareSha/reMo】re aboutGloba】l 【warming and climate\ changeOceanEcosystemEnvironmental prot\ecti/onP\artne【r: Copernicus 【 【\ Most 】viewed \ / / / What】 influence on climat【e// is the coronav\ir\us lockdow\n really havin】g? 】 \ The n\】\ew 【【AI system safeguarding prem】ature\ \ba/bies from infection 【 / 】 / 】 \ Messenger RN【A: the mo【lecule that may teach ou【r bodies to b】eat canc\er \ \A/p【ple and Google say/ they'll 】work tog【ether to t\race spread of coronavirus via smart/p】hones \ 】 【 \ How EU funding is chang【ing \the face o】f Latvian innovation \ Browse toda\y�【39;s/ tagsyW6P

hCIcGreen growth: promot/ing i【n【n】ovation and sus/ta\in/ability to foster busines\s in Europe\zmI9

nDkk“Time is running o/ut”, stres\sed Carolina Schmidt, Chi】l\e’s Environ【men\t and Climate Minister, /in a /】video 【ad\dress before 2019&】rsquo;s Cl】/imate Conference COP25 la\st Decembe【r. &ldqu【o;There can【n【ot be 】an effe/ctive】 global res\ponse/ to clima\te cha\nge withou\t a global response o】n\ ocean/ i/ssues,&rdquo/; she added.】 Ocean issues range widely, fr【om sea【-level rise a\nd lo【ss【【 of 】oxygen, to incr】eas/ed water temperatures and ch【anges thr/ou/ghout e】cosys【te】m【s. The Inte【rgovernmental 】Pane\l 】for /Cl/imate Chan【ge&rsquo/;s (IPCC) sp【ecial report on the s\tate// of the oc】ean\s f/eatures worrying future t\rends, while last 】year\, the heat in the oceans saw the highest value/ /ev】er recorded.Ocean aci】di【f\ica】tion 【u【ndermines the integrity of m【arine ecosystemsOcean a\cidifi【c】atio】n is the phenomenon in wh【ich o/ceans are becoming】 mo/re/ acidic, as they /conti【nu】e to a【bsorb more and 】more of carbo】/n in the atmosphere/, which is【 increasing due \to h】uman-produce】d emissions. In the】 last 200 years, about 30 percent【 of those\ total emissions have\ been gu】lped by\ the ocean, and 】today, sea wat/ers st\ill/ take in a【bout 25【 percent annually.Ocean acidification occurs when seawater rea【cts/ 】w】i【th the CO2 it ab【\sorb【s from t/he 】/atmosphe/【re, prod】ucing// 【more acidity-【inducin】g chemicals while redu【ci/ng important 】minerals - such as calcium c【\arbonate - that marine organisms rely on to /survive】.The oceans’ average s】urface ac/idity, ra【ther stable over millions of years, h\as increased by about 26 percent i】n the last 150 years. “It】 【was a very slow rise unt/il the 1950s, but】 from /then on\wards, acidif】icatio/n gained spee】d,&r】dquo【; sa\ys Dr. J【ean-Pierr/e Gat【/tu\so, researc】\h di】r\ector at the Laboratoire d'Oc&eacut\e;a【n/ographie de Villefranch】\e, CNRS and 【the】 Univ【ersity】】 of Sorbonne. “Since man-m】ade CO2\ emiss【/ions are【 the/ main cause of /\acidification, fut】ure proj】ections depend on their 】levels. In a bus/】【ines】s-】as-usual si】tuation, ocea【n acidification c】ould /i/ncrease by anoth】【er 150 percent by 】2100,” a\dds\/ \Dr. Gattuso.With 9 perc/ent of th】e ne\ar-surface ocean affe】cted by fa】lling p】H, aci\】dification eff】e\cts are incre/asing】ly felt globally,】 across【 a wide range of marine \ec】osystems. “The worl\/d seems to be/ ob【\sessing ab【out what is happening on land【【 and in the atmosphere, no【t realis【ing that li\fe on Ea/rth is wholly a 【s】ubsid】ia/ry of t】/he ocean, that 【a【ccounts for 98 【pe】rcent o/f species on the planet,” says Dr. 】Dan 【Laffoley, M/arine【 Vi/c\/e 【Chair 【on IU【CN&【rsquo;s Wor【ld/ Commission o/n Protecte【d Areas and【 Senior Advisor \Marine Science and Conse\rvation 【for its Global】 Marine and Polar Progr\amme. &ld【quo;What was/ predict\e】d [about acidification] back i\n 2004 as\ something we needed n【ot\ to w\orry abo\u/t until 2050 or 207Ic【eland's lar】gest national p\ark is h】oping to【 /gain UNESCO World\ Herit\age sta】tus at UN committe】e talks in】 Azerbaijan/.Vatnajökull Nati【onal Pa】rk is home to vast glaciers, utterly uni\nh【abit【ed land and ten ac\】tive v\olcanos. Despite the presence of o\p】posing elements/, the great land】scape h\as remained st【ab【l/e【 for/ more than 1,000 years. The meltin【g ice from the /glaciers f【uels some of Iceland'】s most powerful rivers. T】he seasonal ebb 】and flo\w of the ice 】i】s 【crit】ical in mainta/】】ining the/ sta】】bilit\y of the ecosystem of】 /Vatnaj&o】um】】l/;kull\, wh】ich covers 14% of Iceland.Now, however, r/ising temperatures are causing the gl【aciers to melt at unprec/e/d【ented rates. Every/ y\ear, more ice disappears,/ r/evea【ling 】new la\nd underneath the glaciers. In the/ last \century】 alone】, Vatnajök\ull has lost 10% of its volume.The a/re【a is so unlike /anyth】ing else /o\n earth that it has been used as a case study by as/tronauts. In the months pr\eceding the Apollo 11 mission in the late six\ties, Neil Armstrong and his c/olleagues visited the 】park to \study its l】un【ar】-like/ terrain. Som/e a】reas\ of Vatnajökull Nati\onal Park are utterly uninhabited by /lif】e, \be it animal o/r plan\t, render\ing it an ideal】 place to \stud\y moon-like geology.Water, fire /and ice, the elemen/ts that】 make up 【the uniqu\e park【 ar【e represen】ted on t/he nati\onal f\lag of /Ice\la】n【d, blue fo/r water, red for fire, and white】/ for ice. If granted /Wor\ld Heritage Sta【tu】s, Va\tnajöku】ll National Park】 \wil【l b【e the third】 Icelandic site to】 a\chieve the status.Want more【 news?】Video editor • Fr\ancois RazyShare this a【\/rtic】leCopy/pa\ste the 【ar【ticle video emb】ed /link【 bel【ow:CopyShareTweet【S//ha\resen\dShareTweet\SharesendMoreHid【eShar【eSendShareShareShareSe】ndShareShareYou m【ig/ht also l/ike 】 】 / \ 【 / 【 \ \Climate Change top of t\he agen\da as No【rdic mi【niste/rs m/ee】t /Germ/any's Merkel in Iceland 】 【 【 / 【 【【 \ 【\ \Tens of t】housands of Estonian】s perfo/rm mass folk singin【g 】 / \ 】【 Well-being agenda: d/oes this spell/ the e\nd for GDP? \ 】 More abou\t20-seconds【Icel\andEnvironmental protec/tionUNESCO Cultur】a/l 】Heritage ListEnviro/nment / 【 Browse today�【39;s ta】gs 【is happening now.&rdqu】/o;Cutti/ng /the water&/rsquo;s amount of carbo/nate i【ons】 robs a w【ide range of /mari】ne animals of the vita】l material t/hey n/eed t】o 【build protective shells. Mussels, pla\nkton, or\ reef \c】or】als are /some o】f the main sp\ecie/s u【/nder】 threat, multiple s【tudies show./Tropical 【coral reef\ ecosy】stems oc/cupy less t】han\ 0.1 per【ce/nt\ of the o【cea【n floor, but between on\e and/】 9 millio/n species live in and around them. As scientist/s p/\redict 】that calcium car\bonate 】】will drop by the end of【 t/h/e cen【tury, halv【ing its pre-industria\l con/centration across the tropics, /scientists a】re wo】rried that 【corals m\igh【t switch from building to dissol\vi/ng mode. While they might not shr】ink, oc/ea【n ac】idification a】lone 【might lower 】the densit【y of their s\kel】etons, by as much a\s 20 percent by 20. Aci/dific【ati】on weakens/ reef\s facing furth\er /p\ressures from b\leaching-\inducing heatwaves, \as well as economic act】iv/ities\. “We are/ w\eake】ning their repair mechanisms,&rdquo】; says】 D/r. Laff【ol\】e/y. \In【 the ne/xt 20 years, scientists s\ay that】 coral reefs /are lik【ely to degrade f】ast, chall\/enging the l\ivel/iho\o\ds of 0 million people depending \on th】em for food, coastal prote\ction and income.Acidification al/s【o affects deep-water corals\ – such 【as those in the North Atlantic &ndas】h; whi【ch are biodiversity hotspots, critical hab\itats for thou】sands of species,\ \including commercial ones, s】u\ch as shrimps, lobsters, cr\abs, groupers,/ and snappers. “Their skeletons are being eroded /in】】 the same manner as o\steop】or/os\is is weakeni【ng ou/r b\ones/【,” says Dr. Laffoley.A phe】nom/enon not yet\ \fully under】stoo\d\“There are observations of ho\w ocean acidificat【ion【 im\p/ac/ts certai/n species,\】” says/ Dr【. Helen Fi【/ndlay, biol【ogical o【ceanographer at the【 Plymouth Marine La【boratory (PML),\ which uses Copernicus Climate Cha【nge Servi【ce (C3S) data and 【infras\tru/cture to estim】ate the \ocean\】’s pa/st and fut\ure aci【d【ity. These impacts are m\ore often 【asso\ciated with ocean regions where 【deep waters &ndas】h; which 】naturally t/end to be more acidic &nda/sh; r/is/e to the surfac/e, boosting acidificati【on regionally, explains Dr./ \】F【i/ndlay. For instance, acidic w【at/ers d\ama\ge o【r d】【isso/lve the shells\ of plankt/onic 【sea snails, important feed for fish such as salmon.But /【s\tudies have show\n spec/ies can respond in mixed w】ays. Some might benefit from acidification, as well as f【rom ocean 】warming, and /inc【reasingly p/redate other sp【ecies,\ IP\CC experts cla/im. Across ecosystems, microscopic marine algae – 【or ph\ytoplankt/on, the b/asic feed /o】f many 【marine food webs/ &ndash】;【 【m/ig】\h】t suf\fer or flo】urish in more 【acidic seawater. Satellite 【data on ocean co【l【o】ur from the Copernicus Marine Se【rv【ice can provide【\ a closer look a\t the oc\ea/n&】rsquo;s 】C/O】2 uptake and how the marine food】 chain mig/h\t react.“Th】e Copernicus Cli/ma【te/ /Change (C3S) Marine, Coastal a/n/d Fisher】ies (MCF【) Sectorial Information System (SIS) project has【】 produced\ a series o】f marine envir】o\n】ment clim\/ate imp/\act/ indicators\, including several \re/lev\an【t to ocean ac\idification, a【long with a number of too【ls that demo【nstr/ate how th\e indicators can be used in marine applications,&rdq【uo; 】says Dr. James Clark, s】enior scientist at】 PML/【. “A majo【r goal of the project is /to produce a 【set of products that su\ppo\rt Eu\ropean climate change【【 adaptation str\ategie】s and mitigati【【on policies. Indica【tors from the CS-MCF project are being incorporated in【to the C】3S /C】limate Data【 S】tore, and a】re expected to 】g【o /live in the next few wee】ks.&】r【dq/uo;/Impac\ts on /biod/iversityEffects of the 】same】 phenomenon may take different faces across r【egion【s/. Throu/g【/h the mid-2000s, the U.S.&】r【squo;s Pacific Northwest began seeing dramatic】 oyster d/ie-o/f】fs in【 hatcheri【es, as th【\e larvae were affec】te【d by acid/】ifie【【d waters; the vital 【coastal shellfish/ industry was h/i/t\ 】hard. In Canada, scientists e/xpe】ct acidification\ on the Pacific c【oast to 】/give way to increasingly toxic algae】, compromisi\ng shel【lfish, and a】ffect\ing even fish, seabirds and marin【e mammals. 】They also anticip\ate one species of fish-killing a/lgae might wi/n more territo/ry in mo/re】 acidi\c wate/rs, threatening loc【al salmon aquaculture】.In Eur】ope, big mollusc producers】 on the A【tlantic 】】coasts】/ like Fran/ce, Italy, Spain, and the UK are 】expected t/\o 】suffer the most【 from acid】ifica】tion impacts by the 】end】 of t\he century. Data from \t\he Co【pern/icus Marine Se/\rvice, which recently includ\【ed sea】water】 pH am】【o\ng its】 ocean m/onit/ori\ng indicators】, is/ used】 by res【/ear\chers【 to gain a better under\stan/ding 】of how acidifi】cation evo【lves in 】European waters./Acidification effects in/ the A【r】ctic also worry scientists, some predicting that its \【waters wil\l lose its /shell-building ch\em】\icals by t】he 20/80s. Still, there are o】nly spotty measurements of oce】an【 acidification i】n the A\rctic, points o\ut Dr. Gattuso, due to its hars\】h rese/ar\ch condit/io【ns. \&/ldquo;W\/hat we do know】 is that /Ar【ctic wate/rs are natu\/rall/y mo【re【 a【/cidic – as CO2, li/ke \all gases, dissolves much faster in cold \water. We worry【 that in about 10 percen/t of the\/ A【/rctic’s o/cean s】urface, the 】pH is so low tha/t the \water is b】ecoming corrosive to organisms/ with shells,” says D/r. Gatt\us【o.Changes 【in ocean physics\ and chemistry a\nd impacts o】n organisms and ec/osystem service\】s according to /str/ingent 【(R【CP2.6/)/ an\d/ high bu【sines】s-as-usual 】(RC【/P8.5) CO2 emissions scena】rios.Source: Scie/nce Mag】 “The prob\lem【 is we are really asking for trouble by changing\ t\】he fu】nction\ality of the ocean,&r】dquo; says Dr. Laffoley, who highlights that 【th】e mix of acidificatio\n,\ ocean wa/r/ming an】d lo/ss o】f /oxyge【/n i\n the water】 is weake【ni】ng t【he overall system, with poorly u】nder【sto】od consequences. “The scale and the /amount【 of carbon a\nd h】eat going into the\ ocean is j】ust truly j】aw-dropp/ing. It&rsqu/o;s a\ proble【m that we 【are】 rather storing up than r】esolving it./” Reversing acidif】ication i/mpac/ts on ecosyst/ems?【“We have already\ commit】ted 【to ocea】n a【/c】idif\ication to its current levels and beyond【, through the amounts of】 CO2 emi/\tted,\” says Dr. 】Fin/dl】ay.】 &ldqu】o;T\he onl\y certain approach is mitigatin\g CO2 e【missions,\&rd【qu】o; say】s Dr. Gattuso. “It w\ill take\ a long time to go back to【 the preindustri\al stat/e, but we can /stop oce【an acidification./”Scie【【nce\ i【s exploring solut【【i【ons, but their 【effects on\ e【cosyst\ems and oce\an pr\oce\sses are not yet fully unders\tood. \Some oc\ean-based 【climate change fixes don/&rsq\uo;t t/arget directly oc\ean acidifi【】cation, while】 others might not be very efficient at\ lockin/g away the carbon. However, 【“more researc】h is being done 】to investiga\te ho】w 】we can use macro\algae, sea-grass b】eds, man】gr/oves, et】\c to st【/ore c】arb】on and also to lo【cally/ ease ocea\n acidi【fica/tion,” says Dr. Findlay\.Adapting fisheries to ease t/he pr【e/ssures o/n ecosystems 【may also provide a way to live with ocean acidification. For\ exampl【【e, 】C3S and PML are com\【】bining wh【at mod\el【s/ say abou【t potential ef\fects of 】c】【limate change on Europe/an s【eas with 】speci/es inf\ormation /to f\oresee how fish s/\toc】ks mig】ht /change/ and【/ how ind/【ustri\es and people depending\ on fisheri】es need to ada】pt./ /“The C3S data will】 be/ used to identify /areas of opportunity【, such as】【 increases in number\s of some fish species\, a【s we/ll as risks, such as dec/lining fish stocks\,&\rd】quo; says Dr. Clark.\ &】ldquo;As/ a\ \result, the sector will be able to mitigate the effects of climate change 【by p/lan【ning sustainable fi/shing practices./&/】rd【quo;Identifying which pa/rts o】f the【 oce】an need u【rgent conserv】ation cou\ld】 al【so help ecosystems mit】igate aci【dification. Experts have been map/ping c/ritical marine ecos】ystems to spot\ where protected\ areas should be /created or \exte\n/ded. &l/dquo;We can h/ave /places【 【where we take th】at\ pressure off, so we give/ areas of the oceans the be【st\ h】ope 【of ri\din【\g\ out the cha【llen\ges that they face \while we go ab/out reducing CO2 emissions,” s【ays \D】【r. La\ffoley.Share this /articleShareTw\/ee/tShares\endSha/reTweetShar/esendMore/Hide\ShareSendSh】areShare】ShareSendShareSha/reMo】re aboutGloba】l 【warming and climate\ changeOceanEcosystemEnvironmental prot\ecti/onP\artne【r: Copernicus 【 【\ Most 】viewed \ / / / What】 influence on climat【e// is the coronav\ir\us lockdow\n really havin】g? 】 \ The n\】\ew 【【AI system safeguarding prem】ature\ \ba/bies from infection 【 / 】 / 】 \ Messenger RN【A: the mo【lecule that may teach ou【r bodies to b】eat canc\er \ \A/p【ple and Google say/ they'll 】work tog【ether to t\race spread of coronavirus via smart/p】hones \ 】 【 \ How EU funding is chang【ing \the face o】f Latvian innovation \ Browse toda\y�【39;s/ tagsNtPn

1.naSrText sizeAa】AaThere/’s a r/ea\son 】car bodywork is often referred to as ‘coachw【o\r/】k’. It】&rsquo】\;s【 beca】u/se the e\arliest cars /were】 litt【le more th/a\n motor/ised】【 version of h\orse【-drawn\ coach【es with passenger compartments usually made from wooden skeletons clothed in more wood, le【ather or fabric.\ \As car】 design moved】 on, s【o did】 the construction /of /their bo【dies to ste/el and aluminium. Now we are seeing a diversificati/on of /materials used to 】skin 】cars to\ maximise their s\/af//et】y and to ensure they /are lightweigh/t as well as】 s/ustainabl/e.Th\【is heralds a period of developme【nt and innova/tion tha【t hasn&\】rsquo;t been seen since the i/nt】roduction of carbo\n fibr/\e to Formu【la/ 1 racing /ca\rs in 1981.】 Bef【ore that, glassfibre was the \oth/er mo【s\t no】teworthy step fo【\r【ward in mat】eria\ls 【when it became a\ pop【ular choice】 fo\r creati【ng/ /【】comple】x shapes in the 】early 1950s for numerous home-bu\il\d specials.Related | Flying/ cars:\ ho】w close are we?Li/gh【twei】【ght \carbon fibreTo】day, the d】\eve】lopment of】 n\ew m【ate\rials is being undert【ak】en in a more structured and scienti\fic man\ner./ This 【i【s cle\ar f【rom 】the approach be【ing tak/en 【to creati/ng \car【【bon fibr】e that’s cheaper and eas【ier to】 produce. Lightweig【ht carbo】n】【 fibre is/ idea【l for man【y】 exterio/r car bod\y par【ts as it can/ be mou\lded into【 multi-contoured shapes easil【y w/hile】 remaining very strong to resist the k【nocks and bump【】s that car【s\ have to endure in normal life.Reducing the cost of maki\ng carb【on fibre also addresses one \of the drawbacks【 of this】 material in the past: 【th】e cost of repairing or repl】acing【 it. For example, fixing\ Ro/w】an Atk\inson】’s McL\aren F1 with \all of its carbon fibre part【s 】is thou/g【ht【 to h】av\e been the largest ever vehicle】 insurance pay-out in UK his\】tory at &po/und;910,000.Wonder/ material from【 recycled c】lo\thi【ng 【Voir\ cett【e public】ation】 sur Instagram】U/ne publication partagée par Faraday Fut\ure \(@fa】radayfutu\re) le 27 /\Juin 2018 &/ag【【rav\/e; 11 :27 PDTToday, we find carbon\ 【fibre in u\se a】cross many\ mainstream cars,/ tho\ugh/ it tends to【 b\e us/ed in str\ategic areas whe\re\ stren】gth and lightweight materi/als【 ar【e cr【uci【al. Using【【 carbon fibre /more widely】 /lowers m/anufacturing costs, which 【is why comp【anies li/ke Fara【da\y F\uture based 【in California, USA are【 wo\r/k】ing on ma/\king th】is wonder m\ater】ial from recycled clothing. By bre\aking th】e materials down\ to t【heir】 /molecular\ 】leve/l】, it&r】squo;s possible to re-\engin/e】er them in】to carbon f】ibr/e.Related |If you c/ou/ld】 fly cl\eanly, would you?R】odrigo Caula/, a \material designer at Faraday, e/xplai【n/s: "【It sou】nds like science fiction\, but it’s happ/】ening now. We can extrude \entirely new bi】o-based fibr/es with special equipment and re-engineer the molecu\lar properti\es of \the sour【ce material \dur/i【ng this proce\ss. /You\ co【uld technic\ally design a fibre to be h\ydrophobic, fire【 retardant or /biodegradable\ – it’s almost alch】】【emy.】"Howeve\r, in/dustry】 anal//ysts 】reckon the average car wil】l only have a 15% carb【/o【n fibr\e content by 2040. The majorit/y \o\f the \】\remaining material w/【ill remain steel, but much of this w】ill be mor】e speciali/sed versions of\ st/eel such as //Ult/ra High】 Strength Steel and boron steel fo【r】 key co/mponents. That’s good for the rig】idity /of/ 【the car and its /c/rash-worth】ines/s, but the more specialised the ste\el, the /more difficult /it becomes 【to recycle.】So, for bodywork, composite materials lik\e carbon fibre rem\ain 【the key to th\e future. While carb【on fibre is \becoming \mo】\r\/e a/fforda【ble and easier to make, there are other co\mposites being develo】ped. Plastic is one of the 【key】s to this【, even if it\ hasn’t had th/e be】st reput/ation d】ue to 】its【 environme】】ntal impact.Rela】ted |Zooming in o/n the future of electric mo【torcyc/lesInte【/rior panels mad】e with p/las\tic w【aste found in the /oceansFaurecia car interiorFaurecia carsFor vehicle use,【 plas\tics are now being develop【ed from the same material that has been t【aken from /wa】ste sources, e\it【her from\ recycled packaging or even extracted from the se】a. BMW has been l/eadi\ng th】e wa【y in this field and its i3 already /has 【interior panels made【 from/ \c/apt【ured plastic waste from the oceans.Exterior body pane//ls a】re also】 being m【ad/e fro/m/ 】/plastic that i/nclu【des 20% hemp fibre. Automotive supplier Faurec/ia 【ha/s been de/】【velopi】ng this f【or so【me time and has/ created a process that allows the plastic t【o be in\jectio】n \moulded so it can form difficult curves while al】so being lighter【 than m\o/st o\ther formed pla/stic panels【.As well as\【 this sort of innovation, more traditional materials are als】o making a co\/meback f】or car bod\ywo\rk.\ A pr】【ime e/xa\mple of this is wood, 】\but not/\/ th】e sort of plank【s a/n\d varnished t】imbers 【of】 old. Instead, wood pulp【 \is bei\ng developed by Toyota becau\se /the finis】h/ed produ/ct/ 【is f\iv/e times stronger than steel yet 80% lighter. This【 has big ramificatio/ns\ as th【e wo】rld moves more toward【s】 electric vehicles with t【heir h\eavy ba【ttery pa\cks w/here wood pulp can help /\offset this \bulk.Aluminium 】is\ another trad【i/tional \mat/erial /that is far from the end of its development fo【r vehicle bo/dy【 panels. Traditionally used f/or lightweight \sports cars, aluminium is now more widely\ used as\ it off【e\r【s】 the same strength as【 s】t】eel for 】much/ /less weight【. That&rs】qu【o;s 【【ideal f\or exterior pa【nels and a【】lum/【inium is al】so easier to/ \work with when 】prod】/ucing panels i\n \bulk quan】titi【es.Re/lated | Meet the leather maker w\ith th\e lowest carbon footprint in the worldL【ooking around all/ of the /major motor shows in recent times, it&rsquo\;s obvi】ous tha【】t car \】make】r【s 【are diversifying their b/ody panel materi【als. For some, environmental im【pact is t\he prime fa【ctor】, but for/ others it】 offe\【rs the chance to pick fr/om a greater choice of materi/als to suit very specific pa【rts【 of a car&\rsquo;s exterior, which almost completes the circle back to the origi】ns of coachbuilding.Words: Al】isda【ir \Su【ttieShare this ar\ticle 】 \ More from lifeCfw2

2.7ZdW\Clima\te change i/s\ makin【g Arctic waters more access】ib/le to/ vessels, 】\raising the c\on/troversial prospe【c】t of more ind/ustrial-\scale fishing/. On the lates/t episode of】 \Ocean, Euronews】 looks at what'\s being done】 to prev/ent\ /the】】 threat to \the 【A】rctic e】cosystem.Greenland i】s warming\. Among/ other thi【ngs,\ this【 means long\er f】ish【ing seasons. Be/tween the ic///ebergs o/f Iluliss】at, it&rsq【uo;s 】a gold ru/sh. Fish\ing boat】s equipped with【 mo【dern machinery pull up hundreds of ki/los of catc【h every d/ay.Ilulissat fisherman Marti】n J&os【las/h;rgense\n is worried:&ld【quo;There】\’s too much fishing goi【ng on around here】. It’/s so p】rofitable\ now that al【【l the】 b/ig 】】fish h【ave been taken out; we’re catching smaller fi/sh now”.Sleds, dogs and boatsTo be\ closer to buyer/s, fisherm\en are moving from 【coastal villag/es to ci\ti【es. 【The【 population of Oqaatsut, an \Inuit s\/ettlement on Greenland’s west】 c/oast, ha/s f】al/len to less th/an 30 people. Sle】d d\ogs, tra【ditionall【y us】ed for【 ice fishing and 】huntin/g, have been d【ecimated i/n man/y commu/nities, as th【e 【w\ar】/mi\ng climate makes bo【at/s mo【re usefu【l than dogs.&rdquo/;The sledding 【used】 to start in【 October," say/s/ Oqaatsut fish【erma/n Steen Gabr/ielsen, "but now that there’s not eno【ugh ice, we ca【n just use bo\ats all year round.&r\dquo;Arctic Se\a Ice Reaches 2019 Minimum Extent\C\hanging ecosystemAs the seas \get war/mer, new species of fish are finding their way to Greenland&】rsquo;【s c【oa/sts —【 【the/se include mackerel, herring, At/lantic \bluefi】n/ tuna and cod. But not every\one is ha/ppy. \The fishermen say t【heir most profitable catch — halibut — /is getting harder to find during the warmer pa/rt of th【e year.“Halibut li\kes cold water," explains Niels Gundel/, a /fisher\m【an 】in Ilulissa/t.【 "As summers /b】ecome warmer and longer 【it moves away, to stay wher【e【 it&rsq】uo;】/s【 c【\ool.”Immin\ent/ dan【】gerI/n the fut\ure, retreating sea i】ce an【d /changes in/ fish stocks could bring commerc/ial fish】ing fleet【s into th】e unprotected international wate】rs a】/round t】\he North Pole.Scien/t\ist】s a\【re sounding t】he alarm: unregul\ated fishing could destr】oy the poorly studied e】cosystem of/ the Centra/l Ar【】ctic Ocean】, where fish can b】e sparse and essent】ial to the s/urvival of】/ other【 animals.In a bid t\o stave off t】his imminent thr\e【at/, the European Union br【ought all\ main parties togeth/er in Ilulissat to agree on】 a c/】omme】rcial fishing】\ ban 】in the Arc/tic hi\gh seas\ for at least 16 ye/ars.【T【his land/mark internati】onal a】g】reement was s/【igned by the EU, C/anada, C\hi\na, Denmark (inclu/ding Greenl】and and【 the Fa】roe Island/s), Iceland, 】J【】apan, the /Republi】】c of Kor\ea, Norway, Russia and the U\nited States. Together, thes\e 【pa\rties represent some 75% of gl【obal GDP.Arctic cat\ch 2017Under this legally bindi【ng agreement, /the 】C/entral Arctic area - roughly the size \of the Medit【er/】ranean Sea - will remain off-limits for 【f【ishi【n\g fle【ets, at【 leas】t unti/l scientists con】firm\ that fishing i】n the r\egi】on can be done su【stai】nably.Preca/utionary ap【proachAt the Arctic \University of Norway in \Troms/ø, Professor To\re Henrikse/n he\ads the】】 Norweg\ian Centre for the Law of the/ Sea\.&l/dquo;T\his agree\ment/ is reflect\ing the precauti/o】nary a】pproach, that whe/n you// ha【ve little or very\ inadequate /\inform\/ation you should act\ cautiously \and only reg【ulate, and adapt the regu/lation, according to 【the in【formation/ you have," Professor Hen\rikse】n explains. "P】reviously, 【you started fishing, /and then you regu】late it. And th】en at 【that stage,】 it could b\e too late.”/Map\ping the Arctic se/asThe【 futu】re of the】 ban 【will depend on th\e find\ings o/f the scien/tific c/onsortium le【d by pro】fessor Pauline /Sn】\oeijs Leij/onmalm. Sh】e heads a\ t】eam of European researchers on the MOSAiC expediti】【on — a year-long silent ice drift close to the North \Pole.Onboard th/e Polar\stern icebreaker“Normall【y, wh\en】 【the ic/ebreak】er mov【es through 】the\ \ice, you w/ill/ not get good acoustic data,/ because th】ere/’s too much sound fro/m t【he i/cebreaker. No/w we&rsquo【;\ll have a whole year \】o\/f acoustics, and it\ 【is just a d\ream!&/rdquo;As w】【ell【 as using sona/r, the /\EU-suppo//rted r\esearchers will rec】ord vid/eos with a deep-water【 camera, take environm】ental DNA sam【ples at various depths, a/nd for the f【irst time catch some Central Arctic fish.】MOSAiC Exp/edition/'s d\eep-water/ re/search camera“We will\ be able to a/nalyse its stoma\ch, 】its/ stable isotopes, i/t【】】【s fatty ac\i【ds," Profe】ssor Leijonmalm says. "It will tell us 】about the 】he】alth【 of the fish, and where/ it has com\e/ from because \fish mi\grate — so we /w【ill have a 】lot of info】rmat【ion, just by having/ a fish in our hands.”The disco【veries of thi\s \and fu\t】ure】 expe【ditions will deter\mine wheth【er fi【sh】ing /\in the Central Arctic Oce\an /can be done sustainably &mda】sh; or whether \these h/igh se】as should remain untouche\d for the dec【ades to come.】To wat】ch th【e f【ull epi\sode of /Ocean, click on 【the media pla/yer above121212121212121212Share this/ articleCop】y/paste the article 】【video embe【d li\nk below】:CopyShareTweetSharesen/dShareTweetSharesen【dMoreH/ideShareSendShare【ShareShareSendShare【ShareYou might als\o like \ \ 【 】/ 【 \ EU fish/ quota q\uarrel\ - ministe/rs hail d\ea/l, NGOs slam overfishing 【 【 】 \ 【 \ 】 Watch: Thirty-】five years of Arctic thaw in\ tw/o minut/es / / \ 【 】 【 S】cientists have embarked fro】m\ /Norway on the longest-ever expedit/ion to the /Arctic 【 【 【 More ab/ou/tGlobal warming and cli】mate change【FisheryArcticEnv\iro】nment\al prote/ctionGreenland 【 /\【 【 Mo】st viewed 【 【 【 / \ 【 \ \ What infl\uenc】e o\n climate is/ the coronavirus 【lockdown \r【eal【【ly havi】ng? / 】 The new AI system safeg】【uar/d\【ing premature /babies fro/m infecti\o【n \ 】 【 】 \ 【 / Messenger RNA: the molecule that may/ teach our b【odies to beat cancer【】 \ 【 】\ 【 】 \ A】pple a】nd Google 】say they'll work toge【ther【 to】 trace spr】ead of coronavi/rus via smartphones \ // 】 How EU funding is chan【ging t【h\e face/ of 【L】【atvi/an in】novation\ 【 【 Browse tod【ay's\ tagsWALd

3.n4gCOur s【eas a】re 【facing increasi】ng competition for spa/ce and reso/urces — between o\ld sectors, su【】c\h as fishing, and new, such as offshore wind farms.\T/his compe【tit】ion can\ lea】d to \c】onfl/icts.\ Uncoordin\at【ed use of marine space al/so【 threatens the he】alth of the oc【ean, adding to\【 the destructive \effects of c】limate/ c】hange.P/rote【cting the ma\r【ine e/nvironment, re/d/ucing conflicts and e\ncouraging investment are t【】he aims of maritime 【spatial planning【, or/ MSP &m【dash; a proce/\ss th/a【t puts economic ac\tiv\ities and ecosystems on a map. Aut\horities \and stakeholders work together, developing plans at local, national an【d t\rans\national levels.It’s /essent/ial that different economic \sec/tors, a\gencies a【nd governments cooperate fo】r the proces\s to 【/be】 successful. The European Commission and IOC-UNESC\O ar】e d\evelop】ing int【ernati【onal gu/idelines to promote m/ari\time spatial】 plann/ing around the world.The】 goal /is to trip】le the marine a】re【\a benef【iting f【rom MSP by】 】2030, covering【 30 per cent of m\aritim\e area/s under【 national j】urisdiction.Shar】e this 】articleShareTweetShare】send】S/hareTweetSharese【ndM【oreHideShareSendShareShareShareSen】dShareShare/More a\b【outOceanEnvironmental /protec/\tionFish\eryPortugal360° vi】deo \ Most viewe/【d \ 【】 / 】 / What influence on climate i】s】 the coronavirus lockdown r/eally having? 【 / 【The\ new AI system 】safeguarding \【premature bab【ies from/ /i\nfecti/\on / 】 // / / Messenge\r【 RNA:\ the molecule that may teach our bodies 【\t】o beat cancer\ 】 【 / Ap【ple and Google sa】y they'/【;ll work \together to trace sprea\d of coro/navirus via sm\ar】t【phones / / 【 How EU funding is changin/g the face \of L/atvian\ innovatio/n】 】 】 \ Browse to\day's t】agsGOlU

4.1vepCapturing CO2: How to r\educe carbon dioxide emissions from the ceme【nt in】dustr/yFU3S

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6dU2MEPs backed p\la\ns on Wednesday\ aimed【 a】t improving /【the qua\lity \of drink】ing water and reduce pla】stic waste.T/he initiativ【e incl】udes】 p/roposals t\o sl【/ash the maximum limit\s of certain poll\utants and inc/rease access\ to\ free and safe wa】ter in public spaces across the EU.One \of the p\【rimary 【goals/ is to【 increase publ】ic trust in tap water with the intenti【on of dim\ini【shing the use 】】of /plasti\c w\ater bottles. Singl【e-use plas【tics/ are currentl【y t】he m/o/st common form of marine litter found on Europe\an【 beaches, according to \a r【ecent repo/rt.The European 【Parliament estimat\es these new po/licie\s woul/d s【ave【 Eu\ropea/n households over \€60【0m per year.Share this articleCopy/paste the ar/ticl/e video embed link【 b】elow:Copy】ShareTweetSharesen】dShareTwe/etSharesend\MoreHideShare\Se【ndSh/are【Sh/areShareSendShareShare】You m\igh/t also【 like/ \ 】 Micro-plastic\s 】a/re not just a problem for the oceans, the】y're now in \the air /】 【 \ 】 / 【 \ 【/ The wee【k in Europe: Rescu】e plans, MEPs on the】 fr】ontline/【【s & robo-helpers【 \ / \ Meet the 【MEPs returning to【 medicine amid/\ th/e c】oronavirus pandemic \ 【 / 】 More ab//ou【tEU Parliam/】entWat】erEnvironmental protec【ti】on \ 【 Browse today【's tagsEG5R

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MA9HCan 【econom\ic grow/th and protectin】g the env【【ironment go hand in hand? 】In this episode【】 of 】Bu】siness\ 】Planet】 Euronews travelled t】o A/ust\r\ia to look at the efforts whi/ch are underway to fost【er inn\ovati】on, transform industry and create su【st【ainable growth 】across Europe. "Sustai】nabl【【e econo/mic【 development /aims】 t【/o /reach a balanc【e between envir【onmental\ and climate protection】, qu】ali/ty【 of 】life and economic gr】owth. 】I【t's pos】sible to observ【e, through】 our em】pirical data, that【 the green econ【omy is a driver fo【r】 growth/. In the past fe【w\ 】】ye】ars, \the Austrian environmental technology 【industry has grown almost t\wice as fast/ a【\s the /economy /as a whole in re\cent years," Andreas Tschulik, Austrian environment minist】【/ry.The Eu\ropean Commission is invest】ing 】in】 EU industry for a modern, clean and fair/】 】eco\n】】om/y. One company w\hich epitomise【s this drive \is ECOP Technolog/ies, near V】ienna. The 【co】mpany 【manufac【/tur【【es rotatio【n heat pumps for industrial use. Using innovative techno【logy \the firm helps other companies to recover en\e/rgy and /】save cost【s whi\c】h 】in turn\ help\s protect the e\nvi\ronment【."With our rotation he/at pump we r\each i\n 【specific appl/ications return on【 inves\tm【ents 】with/in three to seve/n years and 【compared to \burning gas,/ but we save an/ enor【mous amoun\/t o【/】f CO2 and this is the reason why we get supp/o】rted by 】the EU th\rough the/ horizon 20 program," says \ ECOP's 】CEO, Bernha\rd Adler. 】 \ECO】P's /innovative work saw it win this y\ear's【 European Busi】ness Aw\ard for Environ\/m】e\nt."Innovation is the key to tr\ansform th\e】 current eco\nomic system 】into a gre\en economy. \/Wit【h】out inn【ov】ati】o\n/ we will n】ot be able to r/each our glo/ba/l climate protection goals. Abov】e average investment into research and 】development】 res【ults in above average grow】th/," in\sists Tschulig. ​ He adds, "\Our top envir【onm\ental po\licy goals are to cut greenhouse gas emissions and /r/educe /consumption.【 A lot o/f compan/ies realise【 this a】nd 【are/ ta/king a【/dvan/tage【 of the 】resulting bus/ines【s opportunit\ies. But t/】he /whole of socie】t/y is ben【efiting【 from thi\s, given t/hat many\ gre\en jobs have been creat】ed throughout the whole valu】e chain."&\#8203; 【 Top EU innovatio【n prioritiesEncouraging innovation and inve】stment to【 crea/te new \jobs and b\oost gr\owth has always】/ been a prior\ity【 for the EU.G/rowth cannot com/e a\t t\he cost of the environme【nt. We need sustainab/ility.Protection of the environment/ and 】sus/tainabl/e development both demand \in/nova\tio/n.Innovatio【n 】bridges t\h【e gap between research an\d the market, making ideas that pr\otect the enviro【nment comm\er【cially\ viable.T\he E/U org】anises the E【urope【an Busines【s 【Awards to recog/nise compan/ies putti】ng inn】】/ovati【on /【a\nd sustainable devel\opment at the heart of their busi】/ness acti/vities.】The a【wards are presented ev/ery two y【ears in five categ/ories: Manage/me【nt, Product and services, Process i【nnovat/ion, International business\ c【oo/peration and Business and bio/div【er/sity.The 2018 】Awar/ds w/ere presented on 14 November in Vienna, Austria.Sha【re thi【s articleCopy】/past\e the article video embed link below:Cop】yShareTweetSharesendShareTweetSh】aresendMoreHideShareSendS/hareShareShareS【endS】hareShareMo/】re aboutBusinessAustriaEnv】iron】mental p【/】/rotection Bro】wse today's ta】gsWJox

XK家电回收Oj

wsbMTe】xt 】si/zeAa/AaThe Danis【h retail\ entrepreneu【r/ and philanthro/pis【t Anders Holc【h Povlsen is already Scotland’s larges【t\ private \land owner. Now he /is/ submitt/ing plans to\ bui/l/d a new】 tourist hub in 】a rem】\ote Highl【and town, amid protest from locals who claim sm】all\ busi\nesses will be driven【 out./The proposed /tourist attraction would be erected in the s\mall village of T【ongue, loca/ted halfw/ay up\ 【the/ sce】nic 【No【r】th Coas】t\ 500 touring route. Tong【ue 【already\ comprise】s of a yo\u\【t\h host\el, craft shop, gen/eral\ \store and \gara/ge, a bank, a 【post off】ice【【 and two hotels.For Povlsen, who【se\】 n/et worth is in the regi/on of €8 billi\on, the goal 】is to/ creat【e a community 【【space in what is des【c\ribed as a “lo/st” a】rea 】of the Highlands【.Anders】 Holch PovlsenAPBo AmstrupThe live planning application/ is being put【 foward 】by Wildland Lim\ited, P】ovlsen】’s self-】m\ade conservation project, wh/ich aims to ad【vance the “sustainable/ 【development of some of Scotland’s most ru\gged, precious and/ 】beautiful landscapes.”What will the】 new village\ be like】?If approv】ed, the vi\llage to\ be【\ called ‘Bur//r’s Stores&rsq】uo;, will consist\】 of 【a /range of amenities inc【luding a】 rest】aurant,】 bakeh】ouse, a shop sellin\g local and se\asonal prod\uce, an even】ts space,【 accommodation】 for staff an\d visitors, new fuel pumps and】 a microbrewery.Acc\ordi/ng to T/\he Heral【d Sc【o】】t\la\/n\d, 】su】ch plans would 】&l【dquo;transform【” /the village and &】ldquo;restore the area to its f\or/mer glory \[]\ whi/le maintaining【 its h\istor\ic c【harac】ter/.&rdquo】; U/nder】 design【\ princ】iples in the/ plann】【ing ap\pl】/ication\, Wi\ldland Limited also claim that the village will “be s【ustainable 】\and respect the n【atural beau/ty” of the area and\ prior/itise /pedestrians.Vision of the/ villageWil】\dland Limite\dEve】nts space for c/\ultural/live music eventsWild】l【\and LimitedBurr'【s Stores 【pr】】opose\d imagesWi\ldland LimitedWill the\ plan/s negatively affect local bus【iness/es?So far, Tongue, Melness and Skerray Co【mmunity 】Council, Kyl/e 】/of Tongue /Hostel and the Ben Loya【l Hotel have a【ll object\ed the plans. “This is n】ot\ fair comp】et【iti】on for other accommodatio\n providers i】n the area 【and will d/irectl\y d/isplace\ business from 】us and other providers,&\rd/quo; 】Suza】\n\ne Mackay,】 【owne/r of\ the Kyle /of\ Tongue Hostel】 and H\olid/ay P\ark, to【ld the Daily M/ail.&ldquo/;Tr】ying to\ compete with a company that has no nee\d to m\ake /a profit is uns/u\s【tain\able,” ag】rees /Sarah Fo】/x from the 】B/en Loyal Hotel.Wil【dland L【imited 】tells Eurone\ws Living that this wil【l in no way be a \tou【rist &lsq】uo;resort’ and is rather a “collection of sensitive【ly re\s\【tored buildin】gs,/ which may house c【afes, small retail\ers and c\o【mmunity spaces.”Highlands, Sc\otlandU【nsplashIn r/esponse to complaints, a spokesperson fro】m】 the/ company co【mmen【ted “we are 【act/ively lis\tening to the views of【 \the com\muni/ty.” They adde】d, “the revitalisati\on of this part of the village w【ill, of course, be a highly colla/\borative effort, with a strong focus】 on complementing Tongue&rsq】/uo;s already】 estimabl\e visitor attr】a】ctions.&rdqu】o\; Ultimately【, &】ldquo;l\eaving this\ site/ to become dereli\ct/ is\ not a【n option,”】 they concl\uded/.The planning document\ states that facil】ities /for both tourists and locals will &/【ldquo;n\ot negative【ly 【】impact 【upon ne/ighbourin】g b】u】【sinesses.”【When asked about h【is conservation p/ro\jec/ts by property cons\ultanc】y Knight Frank, Povlse【n co【mmented, /&ldquo/;you/ might call it philanthropy, 】I\ prefer to think of /it as investing in the natural】 world.”Sha【re this\/ articl\e 【 More from/ pla】cesYOEZ

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DbZWWhat if】\ 】/】we use】d the sea to diver\s/\if//y the stock of a/vailable biofuels?Resear\chers in Aarhus, De\nm【a\rk, are developing a fin【ancially via】ble process that does 】just that/.An ordina\ry ca】r is used to test the seaw【\eed fu【e\l, whi【ch scientists ca//ll a 3rd generation biofuel, and is a sustainable alternative to f/oss\il fuel】s.The tank is filled w】ith 10% seaweed fuel,】 the rest with petrol】 and its performance is compared with gas station fuels."The/ e【missions we 【meas【ure are CO, C【O2, and NOX. And \addi】tionally, we are measuring th/e pa/rticula/te emissi】on】s from th】e car,"/ sa\ys Sten Frand\sen - mechanica/l【 e【ngineer and busin】e【ss【 manage】r at DT】\I."The emission te】sts we got fr】om/ the seaweed】 fuel is on exactly the 【s【ame level /\as wha\t w】e \get from the \r】eferen/ce fuel."Sea【weed biofuel 】does not e/mit less CO2,\/ but \unl/ike \petrol, it extracts CO2 from the a\tmosphere while \gro【wing.\The】 researchers plan t\o \increase 】the portion 】used in the engi】ne tank, convinced that w【e will switch 】to biofuels in 【the upcoming years."We see】 a lot of el\ectrical cars entering the m/】arket, b】ut is that a one fix-all solution for /the CO2/ em【ission【s?" asks\ Frandsen."\Because we have hea【vy-duty tran】/\sport, we have sh】i】ps/ we have aerop/lanes,/ still c】onsuming a large amount of fossil fuels. We \nee】d 】a subst】i/tute for tha】t, and maybe\,【 seaweed co【uld be\/ som/e of the【 soluti【【on【".Why /is seaweed sustainabl\e? 【First, be\caus【e it /grows 】everywhere. It only needs the su\n and the sea,// which covers 70% of ou\r planet】.Its cultivation does not /requir【e any arable 】la\nd, 】fertilizer or freshwater/,/ like othe】r\ biof\u【els made out of/ agricultural \r\esidues for exam\ple.But 】how can 【this new fu\el be produced on an industrial 】s/cale? /This is the ch\allenge of 】a European re】search【 pr】oject c/alled Mac/roF/uels.Scien\【tists at the laboratory【 in P/etten, Nether【lands, 】are /searching f【o】r the best way t\o convert/ seaweed sug\ars to f\ue【ls.In/ some specie/s, this can r/【epres【ent up 【to 60% of\ the plant.【In /the l/】ong term, th/ey woul/d no l\onger】 have to produce bot/tles, /b\ut tons of 】ethanol and butanol barrels.】 S】til\l follo】wing a rat\her basi【c process\:"First /w\/e t】ake s\eawe/ed. And t\hen we use wa/ter to get the suga/rs】 out with some enzymes or acids," says Jaap Van 【Hal, a 【chemist &am\p; i【n\【n\ovation manager at b】iorefin/ery, TNO and macrofuel p/roject scie【ntific coordinat】o】r."\A】nd then you \get a sugar solution, and j/ust like you\ pr【oduce wine or beer, you f\er】ment it to /Ethanol or But\anol, and you blend t/hat with normal ga\soline or d【iesel to pr\oduce E10 \and t/hen you 【drive y/our car \on i】t."More biofuel/ production means more /se/aweed biomass. Th/anks to economies of scale an/d mechaniz/at/ion, res/e\archers\ h/ope to cut the fue\l produc【tio/n costs by 100 per cen】t.T【oget【her with comm【ercializi】ng oth/er】 seaweed 【products【, this could make fuels economically\ feasible in the future."When we started】 the p【roject a couple o\f year/s /ago【/, we were working】 with square meters. Today we are do【in\g hectares, 【and in t【he \near future, we will go in the squar/e kilometre range," says Bert Groenendaal【/, a chemist & R&a/mp;/D project coo/rdinator at】 \】SIOEN.T】o/day】, th\e pr】ice 】of a l\itre【 of seaweed-based biofue\l \is /way to\o high, probably a】 /hundred times more expensi】ve than traditi/o】nal fuels. But when the scale will go up, the p】rice will \g】o down, and we【 will\ get into a ran\ge where we will/ be comp\etitive with tr\aditional /fuels."Based】 on the exa\mple of the w】i【nd secto【r, scientists estimate】 t【hat it will take around 25 \years for the technology to be p\r】ofitable on 【a very large scale.1212Ad【dition\al\ so】urces\ •【 Edi/tor,\ Christele Ben Al\iShare this articleCopy/pas】te\ the /article video embed link below:CopyShareTweetSharese【ndShareTweetSharesendMo】reH\ideShar\eSe/ndShareShareShareSendShareS【h【areYou might also lik】\e \】 Could jellyfis】\【h be the a【nswer to fighting o/cean pol/l\ution? 【 】】 / / / / / Liquid windows and the energy-ef】ficient bu【ildin【gs of tomorrow \ More ab\outCarsFuelResearchEcologyEn【vironm\ental protecti/on/ \ Most viewed 【 What influence on climate is\ t\he corona】virus 】lock/down /really havi】n/g【? 】 / / 】 / The new AI system safeguarding 】pr\ema/ture babies \from infe【ction / \ Messen【ge/r RNA: the /molec\ule 【that\ may teach our 】bodie/s to beat cancer 【 / 【 \ 】 \ 】 Apple and Google【 say they&#;ll work togethe】r【 to trace spread of】 coronavirus via /sm】artph】o【nes【 / How EU funding is cha/n【ging the/ f【a【\】ce of Latvi/an innovation 】 / 【 】 Browse】\ to\da【y'】;s tagssnTq

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5ExRMEPs backed p\la\ns on Wednesday\ aimed【 a】t improving /【the qua\lity \of drink】ing water and reduce pla】stic waste.T/he initiativ【e incl】udes】 p/roposals t\o sl【/ash the maximum limit\s of certain poll\utants and inc/rease access\ to\ free and safe wa】ter in public spaces across the EU.One \of the p\【rimary 【goals/ is to【 increase publ】ic trust in tap water with the intenti【on of dim\ini【shing the use 】】of /plasti\c w\ater bottles. Singl【e-use plas【tics/ are currentl【y t】he m/o/st common form of marine litter found on Europe\an【 beaches, according to \a r【ecent repo/rt.The European 【Parliament estimat\es these new po/licie\s woul/d s【ave【 Eu\ropea/n households over \€60【0m per year.Share this articleCopy/paste the ar/ticl/e video embed link【 b】elow:Copy】ShareTweetSharesen】dShareTwe/etSharesend\MoreHideShare\Se【ndSh/are【Sh/areShareSendShareShare】You m\igh/t also【 like/ \ 】 Micro-plastic\s 】a/re not just a problem for the oceans, the】y're now in \the air /】 【 \ 】 / 【 \ 【/ The wee【k in Europe: Rescu】e plans, MEPs on the】 fr】ontline/【【s & robo-helpers【 \ / \ Meet the 【MEPs returning to【 medicine amid/\ th/e c】oronavirus pandemic \ 【 / 】 More ab//ou【tEU Parliam/】entWat】erEnvironmental protec【ti】on \ 【 Browse today【's tagsT7kR

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zlLOMore preparation time and p\eople obeying \con/finem/ent measures has helped Portugal manage its co【ronavirus o/ut/break, it's been claimed.Por】tugal h\as vastly di】fferent COVID-19 in【fecti\on and death rates/ com【pared /to【 n\eighbouring Spain, one of the \worst hit countries.【 Pulmonologist Dr【/ F/ilipe Froe】\s, an advisor to health chief Graça Frei】tas, said/ Portugal ha/d 】benef\i/ted 】f【rom being【 b/ehind Madrid in【 t/erms of the virus\'\ spread. Th\is, he adde】d, had given the/ country time to get hospitals ready【】 and \increase capacity in inte\nsi\】ve ca【re units."The differ【enc】e 【in Portugal was that we/ had more time to/ prepare," Dr Froes told Euronews' Good Morning Europ/e 【sho】w."We think we are three weeks behind】 Italy 】and pe】rhap【s one w\e/ek a/【【nd a half \behind Sp/ain, s】o thi【s gave【 us time,\ precious days, to prepare.\ I】 think\ the main differ】ence was\ also the early e/【n\gag\ement of primary ca\re physicians."Portugal】 declared 【a state of emergency o】n 18 March, just two da/ys after 【】the first COVID-19 deat【h wa\s reported.At the t/ime of【 】\writing, Portugal has confi】rmed 535 C】OVID-19 deaths, w\hich wo【rks out as 52 per one million】 o】f population.\ In Spain, m/ore than 18,000 have been /killed by the disease, giving it a r\ate of 385 fatalities for【 【each one milli【】on in\hab【itants.Madr\id's i\nfection rate is also double that of Lisbon's, al\though this measure can be skewed by ho【w muc\h 【test/ing a country c\arries out.Fr【eitas, Portug】a\l's \director general for health【, said /88 per c】ent\ of t/he country's confirmed ca\ses a/re s\taying at hom【e an/】d don'】t /re【/qu\i/re\ hospit【al treatmen/t. 【】"T】he \hospitals are not overwhelm/ed and we /have more t】ime【 and more [better] cond【itions to follow the c\ritical pat】\ients in the ICUs," she said."The data we have indicates that the maximum of our po/【tential ha【s not yet been r】eached,\ which reflects the evolution o\f /the epidemic.\"'【Unsurp/asse/d civic\ spirit'A study from t【h/e Nova Universit\y of 【Li/sbon indi】cates /the reproduction of C】OVID-19 in/ Port/ugal was 【 the low】es\】t in Europe during the first 25 day【s of the epidemic.Dr F/ro】es believes/ citizen ob\edien/ce has been cru\cial in 【prev】enting further spread 】of \the vir\us."【Most activities are closed,【 such\ as s【chools and commerci】al activiti】es, a/nd most people 【are 】usua\lly\ following the rules and we apply the \recommendations of th\e governmen【【t/," h【e 】said.Eduardo Cabrita,\ Portug\al's minister of in/ternal a】dmini/strati/\on, sai【【d Por【tuguese citizens 】showed "unsurpassed civic spirit" in com【plying with regulations\ over the 】Ea】ster weekend."S\ecur】it【y f/orce/s report very \lo】w levels of circulation of citizens \an\d widespr【e/ad a】dherence to recommend【at】i/ons."On Friday, Presi\dent Marcelo Re//】belo de】 Sousa pr/oposed /extending the national lockdown/ beyond 17 April, until 1 M/ay.Bu\t d【espite promising s【igns】, officials 【are/ warning it may st\ill be 【early to【 【e\val【uate Portugal's【 response to the coro/n【a】virus."The are/a of &\#8203;​housin】g 】in \residentia】l homes a【nd their workers】 is identified as o【f 】particular【 c【once/\rn 】and priority【 for a【ction【," said Cabrita.\Authorities fear the/ d\isease could sp】read rapidly through【 care homes as it【 has in ot/her/ parts of Euro\pe.B【ut Portug】al has take/n huge steps \to 】co【ntain the vi】rus, repatriating around 4/,000 citizens f\rom abro/ad.The Portug【uese go】v\ernment has also gran/ted citiz\en】ship】 rights/ to mi【grant\s and asylum seekers who have residency applications underway.The move was intended 】to ensur/e】 mor\e \people】 in the countr【y c/an access】 so】c】ial security and health care】.Share 】this/ articleCopy/paste 】/t/he article video embed\ link below:CopyShareT】w\【eetSharese【n/dShareTwe\etSharesendMoreHideShar/eSendShareShareShareSe/ndShare【Share【You might als/o lik】e 】 Coronavirus】 in Europe: Latest numbers o【n【/ COVID【-1【9 cases and deat\hs / 【【 / 】 】 / 】 】 \ \ Coron/avirus【 /in Eu\rope:【 Spain allows part】ial re】turn to wo】rk as casu【alty figures im/prove 【 \ \ 】/ 】Co【ronavirus【: Portuga\l/ 【grants temporary citize\nship /rights to migrants 【 【More aboutPortu/galCoronaviruslockd】ownEmer/genc【ySpainC【OVID-19Hot TopicLearn more\ about Coronavirus】 】 Hot\【 TopicLearn more about / 】 Coronaviru/s Browse toda/y\9【;s tagsrkKb

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RJrFB【y Lasse /GustavssonThe rich ge【t richer while the p/o/or get poo/rer, and fis】h have no voice or vot【e. This fishy business 】has to【/ sto】\p. Govern【ments cann\ot def\end private in\te】rests an/d perpetuate ine/】quality and】 】mismanagement of/ n】atura【l pub\lic resource at【 the expens【e 【of the en\】vironment, /\small-sca【l\e fishermen,】 coast【al/ communities and the 】wi/der /e\conom/y.】 / Lasse 【】Gustavsson\ Executive Director at Oceana 【 "W/e have /n/ot come here to beg the【 world leaders to care for our future. T】hey h【ave ignore\d u【\s \in the past and th\ey will ig【nore us agai【n. We ha【ve c\o/【me he】re to let them know that change【 is comin/g whethe\r 【they like it/ or not./" Those words were spoken /by a fifteen year o/l【d Swedis【\h】 climate activist Greta T/hunberg, addres\sing】 the partic/ipants of the UN co】n【ference \COP24 i】n Katowice【, Poland】. A child/ points【 \to politicians s】aying that the em/peror has no cl【othes. Bu【t they show no shame o【r】 emba\rrassmen】t/ and keep leading/ us /】astray. The world 【is on fire. We live in times of unprecedented envi】ronmental crisis, the【 “Anthropocene&rdqu【o; ep】oc\h, where h/uman】i/t】y’s destructive impact i\s undeniab【le. H\umans /e【xcessively b/\urn fossil //fuels,\ cause deforest//at【ion, de【struction of ecosystems\, loss of biodiversity and s【pe/c】ies 】extinct】ion. We ha】ve p\o【lluted our【 o/ceans /with\ plastics and\ overexp【loi【ted their【 natural abun\da【nce.【Climate【 change i/s a global challe【ng【e and one of the biggest threa】ts to humanit\【y. COP24 is likely\ to 【fail d】ue to a lack of politic\al will to act and shocking sho】rt-term 【ex\pedience; the road t/o mea/n】ingful cha\nge is very long and bu/mpy. However, there is 】hope in】 【other quick\-/win decision】s to be tak【en which directly impact 【the envi\ron\ment and can b】rin\g immediate results.One such/ opportunity is the A\griculture and 】Fisheries Council taking【 place on】/ 17-18 De【cember in Brussels. European fishe\ries minis/ters will 】decide on annual catch quot/as for the Atl\antic /and Nort】h Sea; \t】hat【 is to say, how mu/ch f/ish ca/n be saf/ely ta/ken out of/ sea wi/thout compromising th\e st】o【ck&/r\squo;s recovery cyc/l【e.\ Fish is the perfect protei】n and \if pr【operly managed, can be a self-ren】ewing natural source of food which \contributes t/o our eco/nom/i/es.E\U l\aw req\uires that management be ba/sed /on scien【ce&m\das【h;biologic/al models assess t】he condition 】of stocks and advise on next year&rsq/uo;s 【catch limits.】 However, the reality is diff\erent due to petty politics. December’s Council is /an earl】y Christmas gi【ft//\ for usually /lo】w-key fi/she【ries mi/nisters and /an opportunity for/ them to shine【 in the media 】and boast】\ 】abou/t how much fish they n\egotiated in Br\】ussels. 【They pa/y lip service to sustai】nabili\ty while the deals they re】ach in t\his annua\l【 h】orse-t【rading】 ritual often overshoot scientific advice a/s】 t【hey co】ntinue to set catch limits too high.Thi\s C】ouncil is special; it is 【the/ last\ on】e for【 En\v】iron】ment an\d 】Fishe/rie/s /Commissio【ner Karmenu Vel/la, who\se term is comi】ng to an \end.】 The decision made will be h/is swan【 song and a last 【/ch/ance to lead the reluc\tant member states back on track with their own legally-binding com\mitment/【】s. C【ommissioner Ve/lla’】s heritage is less flamboya【nt than th/at of his predecess【or, Maria Damanki, who initiated t【he Common Fisherie】s Policy’s reform (【CFP) whi/ch\ resu【lted in】 a】n ambitiou】s EU law with a clear objective: to stop ov/erfish】ing by 2020\.Vel/l/\a’s job was the techni【cal implementation the【reof./ Re\c\overy of the iconic blue\fi】n t【una, hailed as a s\uccess sto】/ry】【, wa\s recently marred【 by 【scandal and a Europo【l criminal investig\ation in Malta, Spain an\d】 /Italy, 】resulting\ in 【t\he sei\zure of over 80 tons of illegal fish 】wor\th over &euro\;12 mi】llion and\ th】e arrest of 76/ people. \The Mediterranean Sea 【is in crisis, with an【 o】verf】【ishing ra/te of over 90% of\ 】a】ssessed stocks. Ho/wever, Atlant/ic and North Sea EU fish】eries - overexploited by 40% - s\till 】stand a chance to del【【iver by the\ leg\al deadline o/f 2020.T【here】 has never/ /bee\n \a bet【te】r】 moment to【 switch to fully sustain】able】 fisher【ies. EU fleets/ alr\eady make record/ high net pr/ofits compared to\ oth【【er ind/ustrie/s due to low f】uel price】s and improved produ【ctivity of/ cert\ain stocks. Th【e/y can afford/ a short-term, necess/ary】 reduction in【 quotas for the sake of longer-term gains. Healthy fisheries yield \impressive returns\, and\ sustainabilit//y p/rovides long te\rm pr\ofitability.In 【contrast, overfis\hing is against common sense, the \law, t/he e【nvironment and the ec\ono】my; it costs us jobs, food, and/\ 】m【one】y. 】O/ceana&【rsquo】;s】 ex【tensive research and country case stud【ies ha/ve s【howed【 how sustainable fishing/ /based on science can further con/tr】ibute to the EU economy:】 60% mo\re fish landings 】(2 m】illion to/\nn/es), EU GDP inc\rease of &e】/uro;4.9 billion, 】and 92,000 new jo\bs【. Thos/e are enor/mous social\-econom/ic 【gains w】hich are har/d to ignore.And yet fisheries minist【ers are dea】f t\o this st/rong argument. Their irration】al behav】iou\r can on/ly be explained by 【a lack of coura【ge, sh】\ort-term think/ing an/d catering to【 particular fisheries lobbies. Recent scandals in the /UK【 and \Denma\/rk \conf】irm 【tha【t 】“codf/athers&r【d】quo; h/a\ve 】mor\e in【fl/ue【nce than scientist】s o【n ministers\, who a\/ct like the proverbial fox guardin【g】 the henhouse.It is no coincidence 【that the worst offenders in terms\】 of bein\g cham/pions of overfishing /are the\ fisher\ie【s min\isters as \th【ey ignore scientific advice and/ cosy up to \the fi/【shing companies. Five wealthy UK families c【oncentrate power over more than a quarter of the country&rsquo【;s】 【【fishing quota, disc/rim【inati/ng against smaller-sca【le fi\shermen./ Simil/\a【rly in Denmark - where the fisheries 【minister was fo/rced to leave his job du【e to his 】coddling of the industry&rsquo/;s “/big fish” - the lion’s share 【of catches still remain i【n【 the han【/ds of a/ fe【w &ldq】uo;qu\o】ta\ \kings&r\dquo/\;.】The rich get richer w/\hile the \poor get poo/rer, and fish have no voice\ or vo】te. 【This fishy b\usine\ss【 has to s】top. Governments\ c/annot defend priv/ate interests and perpetuate \/inequal】ity and \mismanag/em\ent of\】 natural publ/ic reso【u\rce at the e】xpense 】\of the enviro/nmen\t【, small-sca/le fishermen, 】\coasta】l co【mmu/nities and the【 wi/der economy.NGOs and soc【iety will not beg nat【ional m/ini\s【te】rs and EU insti【tutions to c】【are for our【 planet, sustainabili/ty of our/\ natural resources, and our com\【m\on fu】\ture - it \is t\heir res】】p】onsibility. Ch/an【ge will com/e\/ eventually/, and po/l【iticians will be the【 firs\t on/】es to go. Liv】e up to y/our respons】ibilites and do the righ/\t 】thin【g: you are not onl【y po/liticians but also decision-takers and lawmake】rs. Your horizo【n\ should be the】 【good o/f future gener【a【\tions, not t/he 【next el】ection and the private【 sector’s favours. You have the/ power t【o #【/StopOverfishing.\ Bring back our /fish\ 【now!【L/asse G】ustavsson is the】 Executive Direc【tor /of Oceana in EuropeOpinio/ns【 expressed in Vie\w 【art/icles ar\e so\lely thos【e of the author.Sha/re this articleShareTweetSharese\ndShareTweetSharesendMoreHideS\hareSe/ndShare】Share\【Share/SendShareShareYo/u might/ also like / Scallo/p【】 wars: French and】 Bri/tish fi\shermen pledge talks to solve spat 【 】 \ 【 / Senegal's fishermen say /】European overfishi】ng is】 crippling 】them / 】 / / / 】Coronavirus latest: Donald Trump halts /US paymen】t【s to World Healt/h \Organi【zation / 】 More aboutEurop】ean \UnionEuropean po【l\iticsOpinionfis/hingfish industryEnvironmental protection 【 Br】owse 】today&#【039;【s tagsW3AX

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